Planet Sakai

October 16, 2014

Michael Feldstein

Competency-Based Education: Not just a drinking game

Ray Henderson captured the changing trend of the past two EDUCAUSE conferences quite well.

The drinking game: sure inebriation in 13 from vendor claims of “mooc” “cloud” or “disrupting edu”. In 2014: “competency based.”

Two years ago, the best-known competency-based education (CBE) initiatives were at Western Governors University (WGU), Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America (CfA), and SUNY’s Excelsior College. In an article this past summer describing the US Department of Education’s focus on CBE, Paul Fain noted [emphasis added]:

The U.S. Department of Education will give its blessing — and grant federal aid eligibility — to colleges’ experimentation with competency-based education and prior learning assessment.

On Tuesday the department announced a new round of its “experimental sites” initiative, which waives certain rules for federal aid programs so institutions can test new approaches without losing their aid eligibility. Many colleges may ramp up their experiments with competency-based programs — and sources said more than 350 institutions currently offer or are seeking to create such degree tracks.

One issue I’ve noticed, however, is that many schools are looking to duplicate the solution of CBE without understanding the the problems and context that allowed WGU, CfA and Excelsior to thrive. By looking at the three main CBE initiatives, it is important to note at least three lessons that are significant factors in their success to date, and these lessons are readily available but perhaps not well-understood.

Lesson 1: CBE as means to address specific student population

None of the main CBE programs were designed to target a general student population or to offer just another modality. In all three cases, their first consideration was how to provide education to working adults looking to finish a degree, change a career, or advance a career.

As described by WGU’s website:

Western Governors University is specifically designed to help adult learners like you fit college into your already busy lives. Returning to college is a challenge. Yet, tens of thousands of working adults are doing it. There’s no reason you can’t be one of them.

As described by College for America’s website:

We are a nonprofit college that partners with employers nationwide to make a college degree possible for their employees. We help employers develop their workforce by offering frontline workers a competency-based degree program built on project-based learning that is uniquely applicable in the workplace, flexibly scheduled to fit in busy lives, and extraordinarily affordable.

As described by Excelsior’s website:

Excelsior’s famously-flexible online degree programs are created for working adults.

SNHU’s ubiquitous president Paul Leblanc described the challenge of not understanding the target for CBE at last year’s WCET conference (from my conference notes):

One of the things that muddies our own internal debates and policy maker debates is that we say things about higher education as if it’s monolithic. We say that ‘competency-based education is going to ruin the experience of 18-year-olds’. Well, that’s a different higher ed than the people we serve in College for America. There are multiple types of higher ed with different missions.

The one CfA is interested in is the world of working adults – this represent the majority of college students today. Working adults need credentials that are useful in the workplace, they need low cost, they need me short completion time, and they need convenience. Education has to compete with work and family requirements.

CfA targets the bottom 10% of wage earners in large companies – these are the people not earning sustainable wages. They need stability and advancement opportunities.

CfA has two primary customers – the students and the employers who want to develop their people. In fact, CfA does not have a retail offering, and they directly work with employers to help employees get their degrees.

Lesson 2: Separate organizations to run CBE

In all three cases the use of CBE to serve working adults necessitated entirely new organizations that were designed to provide the proper support and structure based on this model.

WGU was conceived as a separate non-profit organization in 1995 and incorporated in 1997 specifically to design and enable the new programs. College for America was spun out of SNHU in 2012. Excelsior College started 40 years ago as Regents College, focused on both mastery and competency-based programs. The CBE nursing program was founded in 1975.

CBE has some unique characteristics that do not fit well within traditional educational organizations. From a CBE primary I wrote in 2012 and updated in 2013:

I would add that the integration of self-paced programs not tied to credit hours into existing higher education models presents an enormous challenge. Colleges and universities have built up large bureaucracies – expensive administrative systems, complex business processes, large departments – to address financial aid and accreditation compliance, all based on fixed academic terms and credit hours. Registration systems, and even state funding models, are tied to the fixed semester, quarter or academic year – largely defined by numbers of credit hours.

It is not an easy task to allow transfer credits coming from a self-paced program, especially if a student is taking both CBE courses and credit-hour courses at the same time. The systems and processes often cannot handle this dichotomy.

Beyond the self-paced student-centered scheduling issues, there are also different mentoring roles required to support students, and these roles are not typically understood or available at traditional institutions. Consider the mentoring roles at WGU as described in EvoLLLutions:

Faculty mentors (each of whom have at least a master’s degree) are assigned a student caseload and their full-time role is to provide student support. They may use a variety of communication methods that, depending on student preferences,include calling — but also Skype, email and even snail mail for encouraging notes.

Course mentors are the second type of WGU mentor. These full-time faculty members hold their Ph.D. and serve as content experts. They are also assigned a student caseload. Responsibilities of course mentors include creating a social community among students currently enrolled in their courses and teaching webinars focused specifically on competencies students typically find difficult. Finally, they support students one-on-one based on requests from the student or referral from the student’s faculty mentor.

Lesson 3: Competency is not the same as mastery

John Ebersole, the president of Excelsior College, called out the distinction between competency and mastery in an essay this summer at Inside Higher Ed.

On close examination, one might ask if competency-based education (or CBE) programs are really about “competency,” or are they concerned with something else? Perhaps what is being measured is more closely akin to subject matter “mastery.” The latter can be determined in a relatively straightforward manner, using various forms of examinations, projects and other forms of assessment.

However, an understanding of theories, concepts and terms tells us little about an individual’s ability to apply any of these in practice, let alone doing so with the skill and proficiency which would be associated with competence.

Deeming someone competent, in a professional sense, is a task that few competency-based education programs address. While doing an excellent job, in many instances, of determining mastery of a body of knowledge, most fall short in the assessment of true competence.

Ebersole goes on to describe the need for true competency measuring, and his observation that I share about programs confusing the two concepts..

A focus on learning independent of time, while welcome, is not the only consideration here. We also need to be more precise in our terminology. The appropriateness of the word competency is questioned when there is no assessment of the use of the learning achieved through a CBE program. Western Governors University, Southern New Hampshire, and Excelsior offer programs that do assess true competency.

Unfortunately, the vast majority of the newly created CBE programs do not. This conflation of terms needs to be addressed if employers are to see value in what is being sold. A determination of “competency” that does not include an assessment of one’s ability to apply theories and concepts cannot be considered a “competency-based” program.

Whither the Bandwagon

I don’t think that the potential of CBE is limited only to the existing models nor do I think WGU, CfA, and Excelsior are automatically the best initiatives. But an aphorism variously attributed to Pablo Picasso, Dalai Lama XIV or bassist Jeff Berlin might provide guidance to the new programs:

Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively

How many new CBE programs are being attempted that target the same student population as the parent institutions? How many new CBE programs are being attempted in the same organization structure? And how many new CBE programs are actually based on testing only of masteries and not competencies?

Judging by media reports and observations at EDUCAUSE, I think there are far too many programs attempting this new educational model of CBE as a silver bullet. They are moving beyond the model and lessons from WGU, College for America and Excelsior without first understanding why those initiatives have been successful. I don’t intend to name names here but just to note that the 350 new programs cited in Paul Fain’s article would do well to ground themselves in a solid foundation that understands and builds off of successful models.

The post Competency-Based Education: Not just a drinking game appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at October 16, 2014 07:48 PM

October 13, 2014

Adam Marshall

Learning Analytics workshop

SAHELA (South African Higher Education Learning Analytics) Workshop

(In cooperation with the Stanford Learning Analytics Summer Institute)

Pretoria, South Africa, 15 September 2014

Learning analytics (LA) is becoming an increasingly important area of investigation – to recognise students who are ‘at risk’, to address the risks, and ultimately to improve student retention. Institutions are moving towards interoperability and most VLEs now build in LA capability. At Oxford we are investigating the Sakai Open Academic Analytics Initiative (OAAI) and participating in online webinars with other Sakai institutions.

Educause provides a collection of useful documentation – the Analytic Research Centre (academic analytics in higher education); a questionnaire to assess an institution’s Analytics Maturity Index; and a presentation at the forthcoming Educause conference (30 Sept 2014) about building institutional capacity to implement LA.

Questions to consider are: ‘What data is flowing in an institution?’ and ‘How can we harness it to improve student success?’ Similar questions can be asked about an institution’s VLE in terms of data about teaching and learning.

Among others, the following two case studies were presented at the workshop:

  1. University of Pretoria: first year Molecular Biology students (1600- 1800 students with three lecturers) – they use Turning Point software with ‘clickers’ for formative assessment in class, providing instant feedback to students, and reporting the statistics automatically in the VLE (clickers are preferred to mobile phones, due to poor network connectivity – students are required to buy their own clickers; in future this cost will be incorporated in student fees;
  2. Medical University of South Africa: the Student Support Referral System – a coordinated process to identify and support students at risk (academically, psychologically, socially), in collaboration with their Centre for Academic Excellence – all forms and documentation previously maintained in Excel were converted to interactive forms using Sharepoint workflows.

International activities

  1. Signals project – Purdue University – traffic light signals for three risk groups: http://www.itap.purdue.edu/studio/signals/
  2. SOLAR – Society for LA Research: www.solaresearch.org
  3. International Educational Data Mining Society: www.educationaldatamining.org
  4. Learning Analytics Masters programme (LAMP): Open Learning Analytics (OLA) initiative – see blog post by George Siemens: http://www.elearnspace.org/blog/2014/04/11/open-learning-analytics/ and http://www.solaresearch.orgfor details.
  5. There are some MOOCs on LA.
  6. LACE (LA Community Exchange) – an EU project www.laceproject.eu: SOLAR Flare event, Oct 2014

by Jill Fresen at October 13, 2014 09:35 AM

October 10, 2014

Adam Marshall

WebLearn Upgraded to v2.10-ox1.2

Release Notes – WebLearn – Version 2.10-ox1.2 – 30 September / 3 October 2014

WebLearn was upgraded between 30th September and 3rd October 2014 to version 2.10-ox1.2. For more detailed information and other minor changes, please looked at the detailed release notes.

If you would like to suggest further improvements then please do so by contributing to the WebLearn User Voice feedback service.

Bug Fixes / Improvements

  • The Home Tool once again displays its content in an iFrame
  • New Oxford users who cannot login to WebLearn because they aren’t yet found in LDAP should not be presented with the External Users login page
  • Researcher Training Tool: previous instances of a course are no longer displayed on the module information page
  • Roster is now correctly called Site Members and no longer fails if the site contains a subgroup
  • Contact Us tool has undergone a number of improvements
  • Announcements Tool:
    • Group-only announcements can now be accessed by participants with the ‘maintain’ and ‘contribute’ role
    • The message is now included in the email that is sent to site participants
  • HTML pages created in Resources without the ‘.html’ extension now work correctly
  • Lessons Tool:
    • The “Add comments Tool” link no longer causes the tool to freeze
    • All on screen text has been updated to UK English
  • TurnItIn is now working correctly

by Adam Marshall at October 10, 2014 12:26 PM

October 09, 2014

Michael Feldstein

Kuali Student Sunsetting $40 million project, moving to KualiCo

The changes with Kuali are accelerating, and there are some big updates on the strategy.

Earlier this week the Kuali Foundation distributed an Information Update obtained by e-Literate on many of the details of the transition to Kuali 2.0 and the addition of the for-profit KualiCo. Some of the key clarifications:

  • KualiCo will be an independent C Corporation with a board of directors. KualiCo will not be a subsidiary of Kuali Foundation. Capital structure, equity allocations, and business plans are confidential and will not be shared publicly for the same reasons these things are rarely shared by private companies. The board of directors will start out with three members and will move to five or seven over time. Directors will include the CEO and an equal number of educational administrators and outside directors. One of the educational administrators will be appointed by the Kuali Foundation. Outside directors will be compensated with equity. Educational administrators will not be compensated in any way and could only serve as a director with the explicit permission of their university administration with attention to all relevant institutional policies.
  • KualiCo’s only initial equity investor is the Kuali Foundation. The Kuali Foundation will invest up to $2M from the Foundation’s cash reserves. [snip] For its equity investment, the Kuali Foundation will have the right to designate a director on the KualiCo Board of Directors. The Kuali Foundation, through its director, will have an exceptional veto right to block the sale of the company, an IPO of the company or a change to the open source license. This helps ensure that KualiCo will stay focused on marketplace-winning products and services rather than on flipping the company on Wall Street.
  • The Kuali Foundation is not licensing the Kuali software code for Kuali products to KualiCo as Kuali software is already fully open source and could be used by anyone for any purpose — as is already being done today. No license transfer or grant is needed by KualiCo or anyone else.
  • The copyright for the AGPL3 software will be copyright KualiCo for the open source distribution that is available to everyone. It would very quickly become untenable to even try to manage multiple copyright lines as various sections of code evolve through the natural enhancement processes of an open source community.

One key point the document describes at length is the lack of financial interest from individuals in the Kuali Foundation and KualiCo, including the uncompensated director position, the lack of equity held by individuals outside of KualiCo, etc.

Two other key points that are particularly relevant to yesterday’s news:

  • Each project board will decide if, when, to what extent, and for what term to engage with KualiCo. Project boards could decide to continue on as they currently do, to engage KualiCo in a limited way, or to allow KualiCo to help drive substantial change to the software approach to that product. If a project chooses not to engage KualiCo, KualiCo will have less initial funding to invest in enhancing the product, but will slowly build up those funds over time by hosting the product and enhancing the product for its customers. Choosing to engage with KualiCo in any fashion requires code to be reissued under the AGPL3 license (see Open Source section).
  • KualiCo will be working with the Kuali community to make improvements to current Kuali products. In addition to enhancing the current codebase, KualiCo is beginning the re-write of Kuali products with a modern technology stack. The initial focus will be on Kuali Student and then HR. Complete rewrites of KFS and KC will likely not begin for 3-5 years.

Kuali Student Changes

With this in mind, yesterday the Kuali Student (KS) Project Board met and made the decision to sunset their current project and to transition to KualiCo development. Bob Cook, CIO at the University of Toronto and chair of the KS Project Board confirmed by email.

I can say that the Board adopted its resolution because it is excited about the opportunity that KualiCo presents for accelerating the delivery of high quality administrative services for use in higher education, and is eager to understand how to best align our knowledgeable project efforts to achieve that goal. [snip]

In recognition of the opportunity presented by the establishment of KualiCo as a new facet in the Kuali community, the Kuali Student Board has struck a working group to develop a plan for transitioning future development of Kuali Student by the KualiCo. The plan will be presented to the Board for consideration.

While Bob did not confirm the additional level of details I asked (“It would be premature to anticipate specific outcomes from a planning process that has not commenced”), my understanding is that it is safe to assume:

  • Kuali Student will transition to AGPL license with KualiCo holding copyright;
  • KualiCo will develop a new product roadmap based on recoding / additions for multi-tenant framework; and
  • Some of all of the current KS development efforts will be shut down over the next month or two.

KS Project Director Rajiv Kaushik sent a note to the full KS team with more details:

KS Board met today and continued discussions on a transition to Kuali 2.0. That thread is still very active with most current investors moving in the Kuali 2.0 direction. In the meantime, UMD announced its intent to invest in Kuali 2.0 and to withdraw in 2 weeks from the current KS effort. Since this impacts all product streams, Sean, Mike and I are planning work over the next 2 weeks while we still have UMD on board. More to come on that tomorrow at the Sprint demo meeting.

I will update or correct this information as needed.

Kuali Student (KS) is the centerpiece of Kuali – it is the largest and most complex project and the most central value to higher education. KS was conceived in 2007. Unlike KFS, Coeus and Rice, Kuali Student was designed from the ground up. The full suite of modules within Kuali Student had been scheduled to be released between 2012 – 2015 in a single-tenant architecture. With the transition, there will be a new roadmap redeveloping for multi-tenant and updated technology stack.

Just how large has this project been? According to a financial analysis of 2009-2013 performed by instructional media + magic inc.[1] Kuali Student had $30 million in expenditures in that 5-year span. The 2014 records are not yet available nor the 2007-8 records, but an educated guess is that the total is closer to $40 million.[2]

Kuali Project Finances 2009-13

 

I mention this to show the scope of Kuali Student to date as well as the relative project size compared to other Kuali projects. I wrote a post on cloud computing around the LMS that might be relevant to the future KualiCo development, calling out how cloud technologies and services are driving down the cost of product development and time. In the case of the LMS, the difference has been close to an order of magnitude compared to the first generation:

Think about the implications – largely due to cloud technologies such as Amazon web services (which underpins Lore as well as Instructure and LoudCloud), a new learning platform can be designed in less than a year for a few million dollars. The current generation of enterprise LMS solutions often cost tens of millions of dollars (for example, WebCT raised $30M prior to 2000 to create its original LMS and scale to a solid market position, and raised a further $95M in 2000 alone), or product redesigns take many years to be released (for example, Sakai OAE took 3 years to go from concept to release 1.0). It no longer takes such large investments or extended timeframes to create a learning platform.

Cloud technologies are enabling a rapid escalation in the pace of innovation, and they are lowering the barriers to entry for markets such as learning platforms. Lore’s redesign in such a short timeframe gives a concrete example of how quickly systems can now be developed.

How will these dynamics apply to student information systems? Given the strong emphasis on workflow and detailed user functionality, I suspect that the differences will be less than for the LMS, but still significant. In other words, I would not see the redevelopment of Kuali Student to take anywhere close to $40 million or seven years, but I will be interested to see the new roadmap when it comes out.

This decision – moving Kuali Student to KualiCo – along with the foundation’s ability to hold on to the current community members (both institutions and commercial affiliates) will be the make-or-break bets that the Kuali Foundation has made with the move to Kuali 2.0. Stay tuned for more updates before the Kuali Days conference in November.

Say what you will about the move away from Community Source, Kuali is definitely not sitting on its laurels and being cautious. This redevelopment of Kuali Student with a new structure is bold and high-risk.

  1. Disclosure: Jim Farmer from im+m has been a guest blogger at e-Literate for many years.
  2. It’s probably more than that, but let’s use a conservative estimate to set general scope.

The post Kuali Student Sunsetting $40 million project, moving to KualiCo appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at October 09, 2014 07:00 PM

October 03, 2014

Michael Feldstein

LinkedIn Releases College Ranking Service

I have long thought that LinkedIn has the potential to be one of the most transformative companies in ed tech for one simple reason: They have far more cross-institutional longitudinal outcomes data than anybody else—including government agencies. Just about anybody else who wants access to career path information of graduates across universities would face major privacy and data gathering hurdles. But LinkedIn has somehow convinced hundreds of millions of users to voluntarily enter that information and make it available for public consumption. The company clearly knows this and has been working behind the scenes to make use of this advantage. I have been waiting to see what they will come up with.

I have to say that I’m disappointed with their decision that their first foray would be a college ranking system. While I wouldn’t go so far as to say that these sorts of things have zero utility, they suffer from two big and unavoidable problems. First, like any standardized test—and I mean this explicitly in the academic meaning of the term “test”—they are prone to abuse through oversimplification of their meaning and overemphasis on their significance. (It’s not obvious to me that they would be subject to manipulation by colleges the way other surveys are, given LinkedIn’s ranking method, so at least there’s that.) Second and more importantly, they are not very useful even when designed well and interpreted properly. Many students change their majors and career goals between when they choose their college and when they graduate. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 80% of undergraduates change their majors at least once, and the average student changes majors three times. Therefore, telling high schools students applying to college which school is ranked best for, say, a career in accounting has less potential impact on the students’ long-term success and happiness than one might think.

It would be more interesting and useful to have LinkedIn tackle cross-institutional questions that could help students make better decisions once they are in a particular college. What are the top majors for any given career? For example, if I want to be a bond trader on Wall Street, do I have to major in finance? (My guess is that the answer to this question is “no,” but I would love to see real data on it.) Or how about the other way around: What are the top careers for people in my major? My guess is that LinkedIn wanted to start off with something that (a) they had a lot of data on (which means something coarse-grained) and (b) was relatively simple to correlate. The questions I’m suggesting here would fit that bill while being more useful than a college ranking system (and less likely to generate institutional blow-back).

The post LinkedIn Releases College Ranking Service appeared first on e-Literate.

by Michael Feldstein at October 03, 2014 03:57 PM

October 01, 2014

Janice Smith

September 30, 2014

Ian Boston

AppleRAID low level fix

Anyone who uses AppleRAID will know how often it declares that a perfectly healthy disk is no longer a valid member of a Raid set. What you may not have experienced is when it wont rebuild. For a stripped set, the practical only solution is a backup. For a mirror there are some things you can do. Typically when diskutil or the GUI wont repair the low level AppleRAID.kext wont load, or will load and fails reporting it cant get a controller object. In the logs you might also see the Raid set is degraded or just offline. If its really bad DiskUtility and diskutil will hang somewhere in the kernel, and you wont be able to get a clean reboot.

Here is one way to fix:

Unplug the disk subsystem causing the problem.

Reboot, you may have to pull the plug to get shutdown.

Once up, move the AppleRAID.kext into a safe place eg

mkdir ~/kext
sudo mv /System/Library/Extensions/AppleRAID.kext ~/kext

Watch the logs to see that kextcache has rebuilt the cache of kernel extensions. You should see something like

30/09/2014 13:21:37.518 com.apple.kextcache[456]: /: helper partitions appear up to date.

When you see that you know that if you plugin the RAID Subsystem the kernel wont be able to load the AppleRAID.kext and so you will be able to manipulate the disks.

Plugin the raid subsystem and check that it didnt load the kernel extension,

kextstat | grep AppleRAID

You will now be able to do diskutil list and you should see your disks listed as Apple RAID disks, eg

$ diskutil list
...
/dev/disk2
 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
 0: GUID_partition_scheme *750.2 GB disk2
 1: EFI 209.7 MB disk2s1
 2: Apple_RAID 749.8 GB disk2s2
 3: Apple_Boot Boot OS X 134.2 MB disk2s3
/dev/disk3
 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
 0: GUID_partition_scheme *750.2 GB disk3
 1: EFI 209.7 MB disk3s1
 2: Apple_RAID 749.8 GB disk3s2
 3: Apple_Boot Boot OS X 134.2 MB disk3s3


At this point the disks are just plain disks. The AppleRAID kernel extension isn’t managing the disks. Verify with

$ diskutil appleRAID list
No AppleRAID sets found
$

Since you cant use them as RAID any more, and so cant use the diskutil appleRAID delete command convert the RAID set into normal disks you have to trick OSX into mounting the disks. To do this you need to edit the partition table, without touching the data on the disk. You can do this with gpt

$ sudo gpt show disk2
start size index contents
0 1 PMBR
1 1 Pri GPT header
2 32 Pri GPT table
34 6
40 409600 1 GPT part - C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B
409640 1464471472 2 GPT part - 52414944-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1464881112 262144 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1465143256 7
1465143263 32 Sec GPT table
1465143295 1 Sec GPT header
$ sudo gpt show disk3
start size index contents
0 1 PMBR
1 1 Pri GPT header
2 32 Pri GPT table
34 6
40 409600 1 GPT part - C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B
409640 1464471472 2 GPT part - 52414944-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1464881112 262144 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1465143256 7
1465143263 32 Sec GPT table
1465143295 1 Sec GPT header
$

According to https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/technotes/tn2166/_index.html the partition in index 2 with a partition type of 52414944-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC is a Apple_RAID partition. Its actually HFS+ with some other settings. Those settings get removed when converting it form RAID to non RAID, but to get it mounted we can just change the partition type. First delete the entry from the partion table, then recreated it with the HFS+ type exactly the same size.

$ gpt remove -i 2 disk2
disk2s2 removed
$ gpt add -b 409640 -s 1464471472 -t 48465300-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC disk3
disk2s2 added

OSX will mount the disk. It will probably tell you that its been mounted read only, and cant be repaired. At the point you need to copy all the data off onto a clean disk, using rsync.

Once that is done you can do the same with the second disk and compare the differences between both your RAID members. When you have all the data back, you can consider if you leave the AppleRAID.kext disabled or use it again. I know what I will be doing.

by Ian at September 30, 2014 01:29 PM

September 26, 2014

Steve Swinsburg

TextWrangler filters to tidy XML and tidy JSON

I work with XML and JSON a lot, often as the input to or output from web services. Generally it is unformatted, so before I can read the data I need it formatted and whitespaced. So here are some TextWrangler filters to tidy up XML and JSON documents.

#!/bin/sh
XMLLINT_INDENT=$'\t' xmllint --format --encode utf-8 -

Save this into a file called Tidy XML.sh

#!/usr/bin/python
import fileinput
import json
print json.dumps( json.loads(''.join([line.strip() for line in fileinput.input()])), sort_keys=True, indent=2)

Save this into a file called Tidy JSON.py

Drop these into ~/Library/Application Support/TextWranger/Text Filters. You can then run them on a file within TextWrangler by choosing Text > Apply Text Filter > [filter].

by steveswinsburg at September 26, 2014 12:31 AM

September 25, 2014

Adam Marshall

Break in WebLearn service: 25th Sept at 22:00

WebLearn will be unavailable for a short period between 22:00 and 22:30 on Thursday 25th September 2014 whilst repairs are made to the faulty TurnItIn configuration: this should fix the problems that users are experiencing relating to the TurnItIn integration within the Assignments tool. We sincerely apologise as there will be no service to users during this period.

Note: TurnItIn-enabled assignments created before the move to WebLearn 10 will now have their backlog of Originality Reports processed, unfortunately TurnItIn-enabled assignments created after the move to WebLearn 10 will need to be recreated from scratch.

Please contact the WebLearn team if you have any questions or need help with this. Please accept our apologies for the inconvenience that this mistake may have caused.

by Adam Marshall at September 25, 2014 03:35 PM

Apereo OAE

Apereo OAE Heron is now available!

The Apereo Open Academic Environment (OAE) project team is extremely proud to announce the next major release of the Apereo Open Academic Environment; OAE Heron or OAE 9.

OAE Heron is a landmark release that introduces the long awaited folders functionality, allowing for sets of content items to be collected, organised, shared and curated. OAE Heron also provides full support for Shibboleth access management federations and brings improvements to activities, (email) notifications and the REST API documentation. Next to that, OAE Heron also ships with a wide range of overall usability improvements.

Changelog

Folders

Using the personal and group libraries, Apereo OAE has always allowed collaboration to grow organically, reflecting how most of our collaborations work in real life. Individual content items could be shared with people and groups, making those items available in their respective libraries. This has always tested extremely well in usability testing, and not requiring the organisation of items upfront has been considered to reduce the obstacles to collaboration.

However, sustained usage and usability testing have also highlighted a number of challenges with this approach. First of all, it was difficult to group items that logically belong together (e.g. a set of field trip pictures) and share and interact with them as a single unit. Next to that, heavy use of the system was showing that libraries could become quite hard to manage and were clearly lacking some form of organisation.

Therefore, OAE introduces the long-awaited folders functionality, a feature we've been working on for an extended period of time and has gone through many rounds of usability testing. OAE Folders allow for a set of content items to be grouped into a folder. This folder can be shared with other people and groups and has its own permissions and metadata. A folder also has its own thumbnail picture based on the items inside of the folder and folders will generate helpful activities, notifications and emails.

OAE folders also stay true to the OAE philosophy, and therefore content items are never bound to a folder. This means that the items in a folder can still be used as an independent content and can be shared, discussed, etc. individually. This also means that a content item can belong to multiple folders at the same time, opening the door for re-mixing content items and content curation, allowing new interesting folders to be created from existing folders and content items.

Whilst maintaining the ability to grow collaboration organically, OAE Folders allow for a better and more logical organisation of content items and open the door to many interesting content re-use scenarios.

Shibboleth federations

Many countries around the world now expose their own Shibboleth access management federation. This provides an organised and managed way in which an application can be offered to many institutions at the same time, directly integrating with the institutional Single Sign On systems.

OAE Heron makes it possible for an OAE installation to become a recognised Service Provider for one or more of these federations. This dramatically simplifies the tenant creation process for an institution that's a member of one of these access management federations, making it possible to set up an OAE tenant with full Shibboleth SSO integration in a matter of minutes.

Email improvements

OAE Heron introduces significant email notification improvements for those users that have their email preference set to Immediate. OAE was already capable of aggregating a series of actions that happened in quick succession into a single email. OAE Heron makes this possible over a longer period of time, and will hold off sending an email until a series of events that would otherwise generate multiple email notifications has finished. This dramatically cuts down the number of emails that are sent out by OAE and provides a more intelligent email update to users.

The display of email notifications on mobile devices has also been improved significantly, making the content of the email much easier to read.

Activity improvements

OAE Heron offers more descriptive activity summaries, especially in the area of content creation. These will for example provide a much better overview of the context in which an activity happened.

Next to that, OAE Heron will also ensure that the indicator for the number of unread notifications a user has is always completely accurate.

REST API documentation

OAE Heron continues to build on the REST API documentation that was introduced in OAE Griffin. It makes all possible responses for each of the REST endpoints available through the documentation UI and further improves the quality of the available documentation.

Try it out

OAE Heron can be tried out on the project's QA server at http://oae.oae-qa0.oaeproject.org. It is worth noting that this server is actively used for testing and will be wiped and redeployed every night.

The source code has been tagged with version number 9.0.0 and can be downloaded from the following repositories:

Back-end: https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/tree/9.0.0
Front-end: https://github.com/oaeproject/3akai-ux/tree/9.0.0

Documentation on how to install the system can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/blob/9.0.0/README.md.

Instruction on how to upgrade an OAE installation from version 8 to version 9 can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/wiki/OAE-Upgrade-Guide.

The repository containing all deployment scripts can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/puppet-hilary.

Get in touch

The project website can be found at http://www.oaeproject.org. The project blog will be updated with the latest project news from time to time, and can be found at http://www.oaeproject.org/blog.

The mailing list used for Apereo OAE is oae@apereo.org. You can subscribe to the mailing list at https://groups.google.com/a/apereo.org/d/forum/oae.

Bugs and other issues can be reported in our issue tracker at https://github.com/oaeproject/3akai-ux/issues.

by Nicolaas Matthijs at September 25, 2014 12:22 PM

September 24, 2014

Sakai Project

Sakai Virtual Conference 2014: Bridging Education with Technology November 7, 2014

Sakai Virtual Conference 2014
Bridging Education with Technology
November 7, 2014 - Online

http://virtconf.apereo.org/   #SakaiVC14

Register now to attend the first ever Sakai Virtual Conference on Friday, November 7th!

September 24, 2014 04:43 PM

Apereo October-December 2014 Webinar Program

Webinars will use Big Blue Button. Choose Apereo Room 1, enter your name and the password apereo at -

http://apereo.blindsidenetworks.net/apereo/

Schedule:

September 24, 2014 04:40 PM

2014 Educause Conference - The Open Communities Reception hosted by Apereo Foundation and Open Source Initiative (OSI)

Educause Conference - The Open Communities Reception hosted by Apereo Foundation and Open Source Initiative (OSI)

Tuesday September 30th, 2014
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM Eastern Time
Florida Ballroom A, Convention Level, Hyatt Regency Hotel

September 24, 2014 04:36 PM

September 19, 2014

Jason Shao

Searching for an ideal home whiteboard

71jkVN7rBjL._SL1500_

I have to admit, a good whiteboard is one of my absolute favorite things in the world. While I absolutely spend all kinds of time writing in text editors, and other digital medium (and have tried just about every tablet/digital/smart-pen replacement for dumb-pens and paper) there is something about how easy it is to work at a whiteboard, especially collaboratively. Maybe it’s good memories of doing work at the board in HS Math.

At home, I recently moved into a new apartment that has a slightly > 8′ long wall space right by the entry. While *clearly* too tight for me to want to put furniture on that wall, the space is *screaming* for a large whiteboard. One of my prime criteria is project/bucket-lists though – so I do expect items to stay up on the board for potentially a *loooooong* time. Looking at options, it seems like we have can figure out something:

  • Actually buying a whiteboard – about $300 for a melamine one, and $4-500 for one made out of porcelain which should last longer (though given I don’t use it all the time, melamine would probably be fine)
  • IdeaPaint – about $100-150, which I have used in offices before, and am a big fan of, but unfortunately requires *really* flat wall surfaces – and not sure it’s worth sanding and re-painting for the small number of blemishes (that absolutely will bother me). There are of course cheaper options – even Sherwin Williams seems to be getting in the game, but those seem to have mixed reviews
  • Mark R Board – the paper guys (Georgia Pacific) – a sample at: http://blog.listia.com/2010/06/08/diy-white-board/
  • Bathtub Reglaze Kit – about $30, plus something for probably a board or the like – seems like this is also a valid refinish strategy – http://wiki.xtronics.com/index.php/Shower_Board_as_a_white_Board
  • IKEA Hacking - about $120 to use a TORSBY glass-top table, picture ledge, and some mirror hangers. Example with pictures at: http://www.ikeahackers.net/2012/01/not-expensive-glass-whiteboard.html
  • White Tile Board – about $20 at Lowes, and even a bunch of comments that it’s a great DIY whiteboard, though some other people have posted notes about it not *quite* being the same, and definitely seeing ghosting if you leave writing on it for more than a few days
  • Decals. http://www.incrediline.com/category-s/1819.htm has some fascinating pre-printed ones – baseball fields, maps, graph paper – that seem really interesting. http://mywhiteboards.com/opti-rite-easy-60.html also has some

Across the different options I have to admit, I think I’m almost definitely going to look into the glass tabletop – I have lusted after that look for a while, and this looks like by far the most reasonably way to get there I’ve seen so far, will post pics once I get something up.

… and then I can build one of these: http://www.cnet.com/news/3d-printed-plotclock-writes-the-time-on-a-tiny-whiteboard-every-minute/ :)

300px-plotclock

by jayshao at September 19, 2014 02:45 PM

September 15, 2014

Sakai@UD

Changing Your Display Name in Sakai@UD

If you are a student and if your name in Sakai (or in other campus systems) is not what you want it to be, you can change it in UDSIS. more >

by Mathieu Plourde at September 15, 2014 04:23 PM

September 13, 2014

Alex Balleste

My history with Sakai

Tomorrow,  September 13 is the 10th anniversary of Sakai at UdL. We ran into production with Sakai 1.0 rc2 in University of Lleida in 2004. Quite an achievement and an adventure that has lasted 10 years and hopefully will be able to last many more. Perhaps it was a little rushed but luckily it worked out fine.

I will not tell you the history of the UdL and Sakai, I'll tell you what I know and I feel about my history of Sakai, that is directly related with the UdL. To get the full version of the UdL we should have a lot of people points of view. 

So I will start before Sakai, we have to go back few months ago, In January 2004 I applied for a contest for a temporary position at UdL for a project to provide to the University an open source LMS system. The tests were based on knowledge of programming in Java servlets, jsp,  and knowledge of eLearning. The IT service management was looking for a Java developer profile as they were evaluating the coursework platform from Stanford. They wanted developers to make improvements and adapt it to the UdL needs. At that time, UdL ran WebCT and wanted to replace it to an open source one in the context of free software migration across all the University.


I had coded a little Java for my final degree project, but I didn’t know anything about servlets or jsp, so I bought a book of J2SE and I studied some days before and took the test with many other they wanted that position. I passed the tests, and I was lucky to win the programmer position  on the “Virtual Campus” team  with 2 other guys.  David Barroso was already the analyst programmer of the team, it mean he was my direct boss (a really good one).  

We ran a pilot with a few subjects with the Computer Science degree in Coursework, and it looked to be well adapted to our needs. Also we were looking closely the LMS CHEF. When founding universities of Sakai announced that they join to create an LMS based on the work of those LMS the decision was taken.

When Sakai started lacked many features that we thought necessary, like a gradebook, a robust tool for assignment  and assessment,  but still seemed a platform with great potential. It had a big funding and support from the best universities in the world, it was enough for us to get into the project. UdL intention  with Sakai was to go beyond the capabilities of LMS and use it as a virtual space for the whole university. Provide in a future a set of community sites, and use for our intranet as well as development framework for our applications.

So we started working on it, translating the interface of Sakai to catalan and adapting the institutional image. We created sites for the subjects of the studies of the center Escola Politècnica Superior of the UdL. The September 13, 2004 the platform was in production.

Sakai 1.0rc2 translated in catalan and customized for UdL





During the process, we realized that the need of translating all the platform in each version would be very expensive, and the internationalization process appeared not to be one of the imminent community efforts, so the IT service manager Carles Mateu and David Barroso decided to offer support to internationalize Sakai. The idea was to provide a mechanism to translate Sakai easily without having to modify the source code every time Sakai released new version. It was an essential feature for us and it must be done in order to continue with Sakai project.  David contacted with the Sakai project chief director Dr. +Charles Severance and offered our help to internationalize whole Sakai.

Chuck was glad about our offering and the work started soon. Beth Kirschner was the person in charge of managing our work and sync with Sakai code. I was lucky to have the responsibility to manage the task on our part. First thing I did was a PoC with a tool. I extracted all the properties of a VM tool to a properties file, and then it was loaded with Java Properties objects. The PoC worked well but Beth encouraged me to use ResourceBundles instead of simple Properties class. I wrote another PoC with this guy and it worked great. From that point then began the tedious task of going all the code to do this. The result was  “tlang” and “rb” objects everywhere. That took between 2-3 months 3 people. We also used that process to write the catalan translation. We used a Forge instance installed at UdL to synchronize these efforts. We implement the changes there for Sakai 1.5 and when a tool was completely internationalized I notified in order for Beth to apply  the changes in the project main Sakai branch.

Although we worked on a 1.5, i18n changes were released in version the Sakai 2.0. For us it was a success because it ensured that we could continue using this platform for longer.  When version 2.0 came out we upgraded from our 1.0rc2. Only one word comes to my mind when I remember that upgrade: PAIN. We had a very little documentation and we had to look for the code for every error we found. We had to make a preliminary migration to 1.5, running scripts and processes on the Sakai startup and then upgrade to 2.0. The migration process failed on all sides but with a lot of efforts finally we went ahead with it.

Once we had the platform upgraded, we started to organize our virtual campus and university-wide LMS as intranet, creating sites for specific areas and services and facilitating access to people depending on the profile had in the LDAP. We also created the sites for the rest of degrees of our University. 

From that moment our relationship with Sakai has not been so hard. Everything went
better. Next version we ran was 2.2, we upgrade it on 2006. By then we  were granted with a Mellon Foundation award for our internationalization effort in Sakai. It’s one of the things that I’m prouder of my career, but it was embittered because the prize reward was finally not claimed. I did not find out until a couple of years after that happened.  The money of the award should be spent developing something interesting related on education, so in order to receive the award was needed to make a project proposal detailing how we would spend the $50K. UdL’s idea was to create a system to translate Sakai’s string bundles easily like some tools did it by then (poedit, ...). The IT service direction thought it was a better that the project wasn’t done by the same team that customized Sakai at UdL and internationalized (I guess they had other priorities in mind for us), but that development should be done by people of a Computer Science research group of the UdL. I do not know why they didn’t do the project or the proposal to get the award money, but nowadays I already don’t mind. [Some light here ... see the comments]

Around that time our team started working on a new project where were implied a large number of catalan Universities,  The campus project. It initially began as a proposal to create an open source LMS from scratch to be used by them. The project was lead by Open University of Catalunya, UOC. The UdL IT service direction board and David Barroso expressed their disagreement to spend the 2M€ finance such a project having already open source LMSs like Moodle and Sakai in which they could invest that money. The project changed direction and they tried to do something involved with existing LMSs, so they decided to create a set of tools that would use an OKI OSID middleware implemented for Moodle and Sakai.  Although running external tools in the context of an LMS using standards and provide an WS BUS to interact with the LMSs API was a good idea  I didn’t like how wanted to use a double level OKI OSID layer to interact with both LMS APIs. I thought that was too much complex and hard to be maintained.


OKI BUS

We upgraded Sakai again in 2007 to version 2.4 (that release gave us a lot of headaches). I also won the position as analyst programmer in the Virtual Campus team that David Barroso vacated when he won the internal projects manager position. The selection process left me quite exhausted by the long rounds of tests that were delayed in time and the competition with nearly 30 colleagues the made ​​harder the effort to get the best grades to win the position. By then, the IT service direction board, Carles Mateu and Cesar Fernandez, resigned because they had discrepancies with the main university direction board about how to apply the free software migration in the UdL. It was a shame because from then we have experienced a strong running back in free software policies and has worsened the situation of the entire IT service.

In September of that year, after the job competition finished and being chosen to take it, I went to spend a couple of weeks at the University of Michigan. My mission there was to work on the IMS-TI protocol with Dr. Chuck to see if we could use this standard as part of the Campus project. These two weeks there were very helpful. We did several examples implementing IMS-TI with OSID.  I spent a good time with Chuck and Beth in Ann Arbor during my visit to the United States, but I really remember fondly that trip because a few days before I went to Michigan, I got married in Las Vegas and I spent our honeymoon in New York.

Once back to Lleida, I insisted several times to the Campus Project architects on changing standards for the registration and launch apps to IMS-TI. Although people lead the campus project loved that idea they had already deep in mind the architecture they wanted to use, so we went with the original idea.

Several of the partner universities in the project created tools for that system and the UdL picked up the responsibility to create OSID implementations for Sakai as well as a tools to register and launch remote tools within Sakai as if they were their own . Although it was very tedious to implement OSID, it allowed me to get a fairly deep knowledge of all systems that later became the Kernel of Sakai. Unfortunately, the campus project was not used, but parallel IMS-LTI could end up winning.

Already on April 2008, taking advantage of a visit by Dr. Chuck to Barcelona for an attendance at a conference organized by the University Ramon Llull, we had the first meeting of Spanish Universities that had or thought to run Sakai. 

I went with the new director of IT services of the UdL, Carles Fornós. He was there the first time I saw Sakaigress, furry pink Sakai’s mascot. Dr. Chuck was carrying her. I explained to my boss that these teddies were given as a reward for participation in the community, and the first thing he told me was, "we have to get one." During the meeting the representatives of both universities that had running sakai, UPV as we, explained a bit of the experience we had with Sakai and resolved doubts that were raised to us from other universities. At the end of the meeting, everyone's surprise, Dr. Chuck wanted to give to us (UdL) the Sakaigress. He did it for two reasons that told me later. First, because we had been working hard in the community to internationalization and helping to promote standards like the IMS-TI with our work in  the implementation of the campus project, on the other hand he gave it to silence some voices of doubt that came out in the environment of our university about choosing Sakai instead of Moodle, wanting to reaffirm the commitment of the community with our University. 

Sakaigress

During that meeting also came the idea of making the first workshop of Sakai. A way to show people how to install, make tools and discuss about the platform. When my boss heard it whispered to me that we should offer volunteers to organize it, so I offered to organize.

In that meeting I also met the man who was in charge of implementing Sakai in the Valencian International University (VIU). We talked with him ​​about the OKI OSID implementation with his technical staff by mail some days before. They were very interested  in this use case. It was not even a month that  the team that prepared the specifications for implementation of Sakai to VIU came to Lleida to visit us. Before I tried to convince Carles Fornós to offer our services to the VIU. The customization of Sakai on other university for us would have been very simple and it was an opportunity to provide to the UdL more funds to keep developers. Carles did not seem a good idea, so I did not even offered. 
Moreover, when the UdL rejected to offer services as an institution, I considered doing at personal level with the help some co-workers. At first it seemed like a good idea for the responsibles for the technical office of the VIU, but when the moment arrived to go ahead with the collaboration, the UdL main direction board showed their disapproval (no prohibition), which made ​​us pull back because the risk of losing our jobs in the UdL if anything went wrong. Finally, the work was made by Pentec-Setival (Samoo). They did a great job. Perhaps it was the best result for the Spanish Sakai community because we got  a commercial  provider to support  Sakai.

In June 2008 we held the first Sakai workshop. It was a very pleasant experience, where the colleagues from UPV Raul Mengod and David Roldan, along with some staff of the Institute of Education Science of UdL (ICE) helped me to give some talks to other universities that were evaluating Sakai as their LMS.  

Soon after, in February of 2009, it was organized the second Sakai event in Santiago de Compostela. There, the group of the S2U was consolidated. By then, the UPNA was about to run on production migrating the contents of its old LMS WEBCT. In that meeting I showed how to develop tools in Sakai. At UdL we had upgraded to 2.5 and also shared opinions. We suffered a lot for performance issues and crashes with 2.4, but 2.5 seemed to improve a lot.

Days later that event, UPV invited us to attend a presentation and a meeting with Michael Korcuska, Sakai Foundation executive director by then. In Valencia it was the first time I saw the preview of Sakai 3. It was sold as the new version that would replace Sakai 2, he told that perhaps community would release a 2.7 version but not a 2.8. It was expected to be on 2010.

Truth be told, I loved it, and I spent much time tinkering and learning new technologies that had behind sakai 3. I went to the workshops offered at the 2009 conference in Boston, the truth is that everything pointed to the community supported the plan to move to Sakai 3, or at least it seemed to me.

On the 3rd congress of the S2U on November 2009, I made ​​a presentation of the benefits and technology behind Sakai 3 for making people aware of the new road that faced the LMS. Unfortunately we all know what has been the real way. It passed as slowly from “being the replacement”  to “something complementary” and finally to “something totally different”.

We did some proof of concept with hybrid system between Sakai CLE i OAE, Bedework, BBB and Kaltura. The PoC was quite promising, but the shift in architecture given the poor results obtained with the technological stack chosen frustrated our plans. Currently OAE continues with another stack but this away to the idea we had in mind at first.

By then we owned a big number of tools developed for Sakai JSF and Spring-Hibernate. For us, it was a problem in the future expected platform migration process between 2 and 3. In late 2009 and early 2010 we started developing our own JS + REST framework based on Sakai to have tools implemented more neutral manner that would allow us to move between platforms in less traumatic process. Thanks to all what I learned from Sakai OAE technologies I designed what is now our tool development framework for Sakai, DataCollector. It’s a framework that allows us to link to multiple sources and types of data sources and display it as js apps inside Sakai. It uses Sakai realms as permission mechanism and lets create big apps based on templates.
Gradually we have been replacing all the tools created in JSF (poor maintainable) by these based in our framework.  Although we finally we have not moved to OAE platform, it has helped us to have a set of more flexible and maintainable apps than those written  in JSF.

In July of 2010 we upgraded to version 2.7. We were still hoping to see soon Sakai OAE as part of our ecosystem Virtual Campus. Everything seemed to fit pretty well. At the 2010. At the end of the month my first son was born, and I took a long paternity. I was not working in the UdL but I wanted to assist to the IV Spanish Sakai congress in Barcelona in November to show all the work made with the Datacollector.  I went with my wife and him, the youngest member in the S2U.

In June 2011 we had another meeting in Madrid, it was organized to show to whole S2U member how to coordinate and use JIRA in a better way to help to our contributions being incorporated in sakai trunk. Some time ago we had an arrangement to implement some functionalities together and it was difficult to get in the main code. Some universities paid to Samoo to get it implemented but UM and UdL preferred to implemented ourselves. But what I really enjoyed in that meeting is how UM had implemented Hudson in their CI process. I loved the idea and my task in the following months was refactor all our process and automatize builds, deployments and tests with jenkins and selenium. 

Looking backward I see that during the years 2010 to 2012 our involvement with the S2U and the whole Sakai community dropped considerably. I guess that our eyes were on shift to the new environment. We concentrate our efforts on having DataCollector framework developed as much as possible in order to have a valid output gate for all those tools that have been developed since 2004. In addition S2U objectives were not in line with what we had in that moment. S2U's approach focused on the internationalization. As I understand it was a mistake because there was already a part of the community focused on that and the S2U should not focus only on those issues.

In July 2013 we did the sixth and last upgrade. In the upgrade process to  2.9 we took the chance to spend some time to migrate from our users provisioning system based scripts to an implementation of Course Management. Mireia Calzada did an excellent job  preparing ETLs and helping to build an implementation based on hibernate.

We took that opportunity to open all the functionality to allow create sites by teachers and students to let them use to work together, now they have storage space for their own projects, communication tools, etc.  That gave us very good results because people feel the virtual campus more useful than previous years. Also, we allowed teachers to invite external people and organize their sites as they want. Many of the complaints we had about the Sakai platform weren’t about features not supported by Sakai but due to the restrictions imposed by us.

The previous tasks related with that upgrade allowed me to reconnect with the community collaborating  reporting and resolving bugs, participating in QA,  and contributing what my colleagues and I have translated into catalan.

During 2013 I also ventured on a personal project related with Sakai. I created together with Juanjo Meroño from Murcia a functionality to allow videocam streaming  using the Sakai’s portal chat. A desire to contribute something personal to free software and especially to Sakai motivated me to make this project. It was a pretty nice experience to work with the community again. The help of Neal Caidin and Adrian Fish was the key to integrate it to the main code Sakai.  

In November 2013, Juanjo and me presented that functionality in the VI Congress of Sakai in Madrid. The important thing about that congress was that the whole s2u recovered sinergia. I’m convinced that University of Murcia staff was the key to inspire the rest of us. If you are interested you can read my opinion of the event in a previous blog post. Now we have weekly meetings and work as a team. Resources flow gently between the needs of group members and goes pretty well.

Now I feel again that I’m part of the Sakai community and S2U. I guess that the fact of working closely with its members has allowed me to believe that Sakai has a bit me.I'm waiting when the next s2u meeting is going to celebrate, and maybe I'm gonna go with my second son born that August.

And that is a brief summary of how I remember that history, maybe something was different, or happened in a different time. Just say Thanks to UdL, Sakai project, and S2U members to make that experience so amazing. 







by Alex Ballesté (noreply@blogger.com) at September 13, 2014 08:18 AM

September 09, 2014

Sakai@UD

New Terminology in Forums

In Sakai 2.9.3, the Forums tool uses a different terminology to refer to what used to be called a Thread. It is now called a Conversation. The following diagram presents graphically the new hierarchy of the terms now used in the Forums tool. Once in a topic, you can either start a top-level conversation or […] more >

by Mathieu Plourde at September 09, 2014 03:27 PM

Dr. Chuck

How to Achieve Vendor Lock-in with a Legit Open Source License – Affero GPL

Note: In this post I am not speaking for the University of Michigan, IMS, Longsight, or any one else. I have no inside information on Kuali or Instructure and am basing all of my interpretations and commentary on the public communications from the kuali.org web site and other publically available materials. The opinions in this post are my own.

Before reading this blog post, please take a quick look at this video about Open Source:



The founding principles of Open Source from the video are as follows:

  1. Access to the source of any given work
  2. Free Remix and Redistribution of Any Given Work
  3. End to Predatory Vendor Lock-In
  4. Higher Degree of Cooperation

A decade ago efforts like Jasig, Sakai, and Kuali were founded to collaboratively build open source software to meet the needs of higher education to achieve all of the above goals. Recently Kuali has announced a pivot toward Professional Open Source. Several years ago the Sakai and Jasig communities decided to form a new shared non-profit organization called Apereo to move away from Community Source and toward pure Apache-style open source. So interestingly, at this time, all the projects that coined the term “Community Source”, no longer use the term to describe themselves.

In the August 22 Kuali announcement of the pivot from non-profit open source to for-profit open source, there was a theme of how much things have changed in the past decade since Kuali was founded:

…as we celebrate our innovative 2004 start and the progress of the last decade, we also know that we live in a world of change. Technology evolves. Economics evolve. Institutional needs evolve. We need to go faster. We need a path to a full suite of great products for institutions that want a suite. So it is quite natural that a 10-year-old software organization consolidates its insights and adapts to the opportunities ahead.

There were many elements in the August 22 announcement that merit discussion (i.e. here and here) but I will focus on these particular quotes from the FAQ that accompanied the August 22 announcement:

This plan is still under consideration. The current plan is for the Kuali codebase to be forked and re-licensed under Affero General Public License (AGPL).

The Kuali Foundation (.org) will still exist and will be a co-founder of the company. … The Foundation will provide initial capital investment for the company out of its reserves.

In a follow-up post five days later on August 27 they clarified the wording about licensing and capital:

All software that has been released under the current, Open Source Initiative approved Educational Community License (ECL) will and can continue under that license.

The software license for work done by the new entity and from its own capital will be the Open Source Initiative approved Affero GPL3 license (AGPL3).

While the details and overall intent of the August 22 and August 27 announcements from the Kuali Foundation may seem somewhat different, the AGPL3 license remains the central tenet of the Kuali pivot to professional open source.

The availability of the AGPL3 license and the successful use of AGPL3 to found and fund “open source” companies that can protect their intellectual property and force vendor lock-in *is* the “change” that has happened in the past decade that underlies both of these announcements and the makes a pivot away from open source and to professional open source an investment with the potential for high returns to its shareholders.

Before AGPL3

Before the AGPL3 license was created, there were two main approaches to open source licensing – Apache-style and GPL-style. The Apache-like licenses (including BSD, MIT, and ECL) allow commercial companies to participate fully in both the active development of the code base and the internal commercial use of that code base without regard to mixing of their proprietary code with the open source code.

The GNU Public License (GPL) had a “sticky” copyleft clause that forced any modifications of redistributed code to also be released open source. The GPL license was conceived pre-cloud and so its terms and conditions were all about distribution of software artifacts and not about standing up a cloud service with GPL code that had been modified by a company or mixed with proprietary code.

Many companies chose to keep it simple and avoided making any modifications to GPL software like the Linux kernel. Those companies could participate in Apache projects with gusto but they kept the GPL projects at arms length. Clever companies like IBM that wanted to advance the cause of GPL software like Linux would hire completely separate and isolated staff that would work on Linux. They (and their lawyers) felt they could meet the terms of the GPL license by having one team tweak their cloud offerings based on GPL software and a completely separate team that would work on GPL software and never let the two teams meet (kind of like matter and anti-matter).

So clever companies could work closely with GPL software and the associated projects if they were very careful. In a sense because GPL had this “loophole”, while it was not *easy* for commercial companies to engage in GPL projects when a company tweaked the GPL software for their own production use, it was *possible* for a diverse group of commercial companies to engage constructively in GPL projects. The Moodle project is a wonderful example of a great GPL project (well over a decade of success) with a rich multi-vendor ecosystem.

So back in 1997, the GPL and Apache-like licenses appeared far apart – in practice as the world moved to cloud in the past decades the copyleft clause in GPL became less and less of a problem. GPL licensed code could leverage a rich commercial ecosystem almost as well as Apache licensed code. The copyleft clause in GPL had became much weaker by 2005 because of the shift to the cloud.

AGPL – Fixing the “loophole” in GPL

The original purpose of the GPL license was to insist that over time all software would be open source and its clause to force redistribution was a core element.

For example, if you distribute copies of such a program, whether gratis or for a fee, you must pass on to the recipients the same freedoms that you received. You must make sure that they, too, receive or can get the source code. And you must show them these terms so they know their rights.

The fact that these cloud vendors could “have their cake and eat it too” could be easily fixed by making the AGPL3 license tighter than the GPL license by adding this clause:

The GNU Affero General Public License is designed specifically to ensure that, in such cases, the modified source code becomes available to the community. It requires the operator of a network server to provide the source code of the modified version running there to the users of that server. Therefore, public use of a modified version, on a publicly accessible server, gives the public access to the source code of the modified version.

This seems simple enough. Fix the flaw. The GPL license did not imagine that someday software would not be “distributed” at all and only run in the cloud. The AGPL3 license solves that problem. Job done.

But solving one problem in the GPL pathos causes another in the marketplace. AGPL3 ensures that we can “see” the code that those who would remix and run on servers would develop, but it creates an unfortunate asymmetry that can be exploited to achieve a combination of vendor lock-in and open source.

AGPL3 = Open Source + Vendor Lock-In

The creators of GPL generally imagined that open source software would have a diverse community around it and that the GPL (and AGPL) licenses were a set of rules about how that community interacted with each other and constrain companies working with GPL software to bring their improvements back to the commons. But just like the GPL founders did not imagine the cloud, the AGPL creators did not imagine that open source software could be created in a proprietary organization and that the AGPL license would ensure that a diverse community would never form (or take a really long time to form) around the open source software.

These days in Educational Technology it is pretty easy to talk to someone on your Caltrans commute and get $60 Million in venture capital for an educational technology startup. But your VC’s want an exit strategy where they make a lot of money. I think that there are likely no examples of VC-funded companies that used an Apache-like license in their core technology that were funded let alone successful. That hippie-share-everything crap just does not cut it with VC’s. Vendor lock-in is the only way to protect asset value and flip that startup or go public.

Clever company founders figured out how to “have their cake and eat it too”. Here is the strategy. First take VC money and develop some new piece of software. Divide the software into two parts – (a) the part that looks nice but is missing major functionality and (b) the super-awesome add-ons to that software that really rock. You license (a) using the AGPL3 and license (b) as all rights reserved and never release that source code.

You then stand up a cloud instance of the software that combines (a) and (b) and not allow any self-hosted versions of the software which might entail handing your (b) source code to your customers.

Since the (a) portion is incomplete it poses no threat to their commercial cloud offering. And since the (a) part is AGPL it is impossible for a multi-vendor commercial ecosystem to emerge. If a small commercial competitor wants to augment the (a) code to compete with the initial vendor that has (a)+(b) running in the cloud, they are bound by the AGPL3 license to publish all of their improvements. This means that if the second company comes up with a better idea than the original company – the original company gets it and any and all competitors of the second company get the improvement for free as well. But if the original company makes an improvement – they keep it hidden and proprietary thus extending their advantage over all other commercial participants in the marketplace:

You can see this theme in the August 22 Kuali FAQ where they talk about “What happens to the Kuali Commercial Affiliates (KCAs)?”:

There will be ample and growing opportunities for the KCAs to engage with Kuali clients. The company would love for KCAs to take on 80% or more of the installation projects. The Kuali platform will continue to become more and more of a platform that KCAs can augment with add-ons and plugins. In addition, KCAs will likely be used to augment the company’s development of core code and for software projects for Kuali customers.

Reading this carefully, the role for companies other than Kuali, Inc. is to install the software developed by the new “Kuali, Inc.” company or perhaps develop plugins. With the source code locked into AGPL3, the greatest role that a community of companies can do is be “Kuali Inc’s little helpers”. The relationship is not a peer relationship.

When a company builds a proprietary product from scratch and releases a portion of it under APGL3, there never was a commons and the AGPL3 license is the best open source license the comapny can use to insure that there never will be a true commons.

Revisiting – AGPL – Fixing the “bug” in GPL (oops)

Now the AGPL3 advocates actually achieve their goals when the original company goes out of business because even though we never see the (b) component of the software, since the (a) part is open source and a truly open ecosystem could emerge around the carcass of the company – but by the time the company failed – it is not likely that their “half-eaten code carcass” would be all that useful.

What is far more likely is that the company using the AGPL strategy would get a few rounds of VC, thrive and sell themselves for a billion dollars or go public for a few billion dollars. After the founders pocket the cash, there would no longer need to market themselves as “open source” so they would just change the license on (a) from AGPL3 to a proprietary license and stop redistributing the code. Since the (b) code was always proprietary – after a few months of improvements to the (a) code in a non-open source fashion and the deep interdependence of the (a) and (b) code, the open copy of (a) has effectively died on the vine. The resulting company has a wonderfully proprietary and closed source product with no competitors and the VC’s have another half-billion dollars to give to some new person on a Caltrans ride. And the “wheel of life” goes on.

Each time open source loses and VCs and corporations win, I am sure somewhere in the world, about ten Teslas get ordered and a puppy cries while struggling to make it to the next level.

Proprietary Code is a Fine Business Model

Probably by this time (if you have read this far) you probably have tagged this post as #tldr and #opensourcerant – it might indeed warrant #tldr – but it is not an open source rant.

I am a big fan of open source but I am also a big fan of proprietary software development. The educational technology market is made up of well over 90% of its software that is proprietary. Excellent proprietary offerings come from companies like Blackboard, Coursera, Instructure (part b), Piazza, Microsoft, Google, Edmodo, Flat World Knowledge, Pearson, McGraw Hill, Apple and many others. Without them open source efforts like Sakai and Moodle would not exist. I am not so foolish that I believe that purely open source solutions will be sufficient to meet the need of this market that I care so much about.

The right combination in a marketplace is a combination of healthy and competitive open source and proprietary products. This kind of healthy competition is great because choices make everyone stronger and keep teams motivated and moving forward:

  • Linux and Microsoft Windows
  • Microsoft Office and LibreOffice
  • Sakai and Blackboard
  • Apache HTTPd and Microsoft IIS
  • ….

The wisest of proprietary companies even see fit to invest in their open source competitors because they know it is a great way to make their own products better.

The reason that the “open source uber alles” strategy fails is that proprietary companies can raise capital far more effectively than open source efforts. This statement from an earlier Kuali blog post captures this nicely:

We need to accelerate completion of our full suite of Kuali software applications, and to do so we need access to substantially more capital than we have secured to date to meet this need of colleges and universities.

The problem is also why it is very rare for an open source product to dominate and push out proprietary competitors. Open source functions best as a healthy alternative and reasonably calm competitor.

AGPL3 + Proprietary + Cloud Strategy in Action

To their credit, Instructure has executed the AGPL3 open/closed hybrid strategy perfectly for their Canvas product. They have structured their software into two interlinked components and only released one of the components. They have shaded their marketing the right way so they sound “open source” to those who don’t know how to listen carefully. They let their fans breathlessly re-tell the story of “Instructure Open Source” and Instructure focuses on their core business of providing a successful cloud-hosted partially open product.

The Kuali pivot of the past few weeks to create Kuali Inc., (actual name TBD) is pretty clearly an attempt to replicate the commercial success of the Instructure AGPL3 strategy but in the academic business applications area. This particular statement from the August 22 Kuali announcement sums it up nicely:

From where will the founding investment come?

The Foundation will provide initial capital investment for the company out of its reserves. Future investment will come from entities that are aligned with Kuali’s mission and interested in long-term dividends. A first set of investors may be University foundations. There is no plan for an IPO or an acquisition.

Read this carefully. Read this like a lawyer, venture capitalist, or university foundation preparing to invest in Kuali, Inc. would read it. The investors in Kuali, Inc. may be more patient than the average investor – but they are not philanthropic organizations making a grant. The AGPL license strategy is essential to insuring that an investment in Kuali, Inc. has the potential to repay investors investments as well as a nice profit for its patient investors.

Is there any action that should be taken at this time? If I were involved in Kuali or on the board of directors of the Kuali Foundation, I would be very suspect of any attempted change to the license of the code currently in the Kuali repository. A change of the kind of license or a change to “who owns” the code would be very significant. The good news is that in the August 27 Kuali post it appears that at least for now, a board-level wholesale copyright change is off the table.

All software that has been released under the current, Open Source Initiative approved Educational Community License (ECL) will and can continue under that license.

I think that a second issue is more about the individual Kuali projects. There are lots of Kuali projects and each project is at a different maturity level and has its own community and its own leadership. I think that the approach to Kuali, Inc. might be different across the different Kuali Foundation projects. In particular if a project has a rich and diverse community of academic and commercial participants, it might be in that communities’ best interest to ignore Kuali Inc. and just keep working with the ECL licensed code base and manage its own community using open source principles.

If you are a member of a diverse community working on and using a Kuali project (Coeus and KFS are probably the best examples of this) you should be careful not to ignore a seemingly innocuous board action to switch to AGPL3 in any code base you are working on or depending on (including Rice). Right now because the code is licensed under the Apache-like Educational Community License, the fact that the Foundation “owns” the code hardly matters. In Apache-like licenses, the owner really has no more right to the code than the contributors. But as soon as the code you are working on or using is switched to AGPL3, it puts all the power in the hands of the copyright owner – not the community.

A worrisome scenario would be to quietly switch the license to AGPL3 and then have the community continue to invest in the Kuali Foundation version of the code for a year or so and then a year from now, the Kuali Foundation Board could then transfer ownership of the code to someone else and then you would have to scramble and pick through the AGPL3 bits and separate them out if you really wanted to continue as a community. This is usually so painful after a year of development that no one ever does it.

The Winter of AGPL3 Discontent

If we look back at the four principles of open source that I used to start this article, we quickly can see how AGPL3 has allowed clever commercial companies to subvert the goals of Open Source to their own ends:

  • Access to the source of any given work – By encouraging companies to only open source a subset of their overall software, AGPL3 ensures that we will never see the source of the part (b) of their work and that we will only see the part (a) code until the company sells itself or goes public.
  • Free Remix and Redistribution of Any Given Work – This is true unless the remixing includes enhancing the AGPL work with proprietary value-add. But the owner of the AGPL-licensed software is completely free to mix in proprietary goodness – but no other company is allowed to do so.
  • End to Predatory Vendor Lock-In – Properly used, AGPL3 is the perfect tool to enable predatory vendor lock-in. Clueless consumers think they are purchasing an “open source” product with an exit strategy – but they are not.
  • Higher Degree of Cooperation – AGPL3 ensures that the copyright holder has complete and total control of how a cooperative community builds around software that they hold the copyright to. Those that contribute improvements to AGPL3-licensed software line the pockets of commercial company that owns the copyright on the software.

So AGPL3 is the perfect open source license for a company that thinks open source sounds great but an actual open community is a bad idea. The saddest part is that most of the companies that were using the “loophole” in GPL were doing so precisely so they could participate in and contribute to the open source community.

Conclusion

As I wrote about MySQL back in 2010, a copyright license alone does not protect an open source community:

Why an Open Source Community Should not cede Leadership to a Commercial Entity – MySql/Oracle

Many people think that simply releasing source code under an open license such as Instructure or GPL is “good enough” protection to ensure that software will always be open. For me, the license has always been a secondary issue – what matters is the health and vitality of the open community (the richness and depth of the bazaar around the software).

Luckily, the MySQL *community* saw the potential of the problem and made sure that they had a community-owned version of the code named MariaDB that they have actively developed from the moment that Oracle bought MySQL. I have not yet used MariaDB – but its existence is a reasonable insurance policy against Oracle “going rogue” with MySQL. So far, now over four years later Oracle has continued to do a reasonable job of managing MySQL for the common good so I keep using it and teaching classes on it. But if MariaDB had not happened, by now the game would likely be over and MySQL would be a 100% proprietary product.

While I am sure that the creators of the Affero GPL were well intentioned, the short-term effect of the license is to give commercial cloud providers a wonderful tool to destroy open source communities or at least ensure that any significant participation in an open-source community is subject to the approval and controls of the copyright owner.

I have yet to see a situation where the AGPL3 license made the world a better place. I have only seen situations where it was used craftily to advance the ends of for-profit corporations that don’t really believe in open source.

It never bothers me when corporations try to make money – that is their purpose and I am glad they do it. But it bothers me when someone plays a shell game to suppress or eliminate an open source community. But frankly – even with that – corporations will and should take advantage of every trick in the book – and AGPL3 is the “new trick”.

Instead of hating corporations for being clever and maximizing revenue – we members of open source communities must simply be mindful of being led down the wrong path when it comes to software licensing.

Note: The author gratefully acknowledges the insightful comments from the reviewers of this article.

by Charles Severance at September 09, 2014 02:26 AM

August 28, 2014

Sakai@UD

Managing Announcements and Notifications

As the fall semester begins, IT staff members have received a number of inquiries related to notifications and sending announcements to students, especially with the growing number of instructors opting to use Canvas instead of Sakai. Below are some options and “gotchas” regarding notifications in UD-supported technologies, including Canvas, Sakai, and P.O. Box. I. Verify […] more >

by Mathieu Plourde at August 28, 2014 05:55 PM

August 27, 2014

Apereo OAE

Apereo OAE Griffin is now available!

The Apereo Open Academic Environment (OAE) project team is excited to announce the next major release of the Apereo Open Academic Environment; OAE Griffin or OAE 8.

OAE Griffin brings a complete overhaul of the collaborative document experience, metadata widgets, full interactive REST API documentation and improved Office document previews. Next to that, OAE Griffin also introduces a wide range of incremental usability improvements, technical advances and bug fixes.

Changelog

Collaborative documents

The collaborative document experience in OAE Griffin has been completely overhauled. Whilst OAE's collaborative note taking capabilities have consistently been identified as very useful during usability testing, the actual Etherpad editor user experience has always tested poorly and never felt like an inherent part of the OAE platform.

Therefore, OAE Griffin introduces a fully skinned and customised collaborative document editor. The Etherpad editor has been skinned to make it fit seamlessly into the overall OAE interface and a number of under-utilised features have been removed. The editor and toolbar now also behave a lot better on mobile devices. All of this creates a much cleaner, more integrated and easier to use collaborative document experience.

At the same time, the activities and notifications generated by collaborative documents have also been fine-tuned. OAE Griffin now detects which people have made a change and will generate accurate activities, providing a much better idea of what's been happening inside of a document.

Metadata widgets

It is now possible to see the metadata for all content items, discussions and groups. This includes the full title of the item, the description, who created it and when it was created. For content items and discussions, it is also possible to see the full list of managers and people and groups it's shared with. All of this will provide a lot more context to an item, for example when discovering an interesting content item or when wondering who's involved in a discussion.

At the same time, the long-awaited download button has been provided for all content items, ensuring that the original file can easily be downloaded.

REST API Documentation

OAE Griffin introduces a REST API documentation framework and all of the OAE REST APIs have been fully documented. This work is based on a REST API documentation specification called Swagger, and offers a nice interactive UI where the documentation can be viewed and all of the REST endpoints can be tried.

This documentation is available on every OAE tenant and sits alongside the internal API documentation. All of this should provide sufficient information and documentation for widget development and integration with OAE.

Office documents

The OAE preview processor has been upgraded from LibreOffice 3.5 to LibreOffice 4.3. This brings tremendous improvements to the content previews that are generated for Office files (Word, Excel and PowerPoint). Especially the display of shapes, pictures and tables has been much improved, whilst some additional font support has been added as well.

Email improvements

The email notifications have been tweaked to ensure that emails sent out by OAE are as relevant as possible. At the same time, a number of visual improvements have been made to those emails to ensure that they look good on all devices.

Embedding improvements

Browsers have started introducing a set of new new cross-protocol embedding restrictions, which were causing some embedded links to not show correctly in the content profile. Therefore, OAE Griffin puts a number of measures in place that improve link embedding is and provide a fallback when a link can not be embedded.

CAS Authentication

It is now possible to pick up and use SAML attributes released by a CAS authentication server. This allows for a user's profile metadata to be available immediately after signing into OAE for the first time, without having to pre-provision the account.

Icons

The icons used in OAE Griffin have been upgraded from FontAwesome 3 to FontAwesome 4.3, allowing for a wider variety of icons to be used in widget development.

Apache Cassandra

OAE Griffin has been upgraded from Apache Cassandra 1.2.15 to Apache Cassandra 2.0.8, bringing a range of performance improvements, as well as the possibility of setting up simple database transactions.

Try it out

OAE Griffin can be tried out on the project's QA server at http://oae.oae-qa0.oaeproject.org. It is worth noting that this server is actively used for testing and will be wiped and redeployed every night.

The source code has been tagged with version number 8.0.0 and can be downloaded from the following repositories:

Back-end: https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/tree/8.0.0
Front-end: https://github.com/oaeproject/3akai-ux/tree/8.0.0

Documentation on how to install the system can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/blob/8.0.0/README.md.

Instruction on how to upgrade an OAE installation from version 7 to version 8 can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/wiki/OAE-Upgrade-Guide.

The repository containing all deployment scripts can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/puppet-hilary.

Get in touch

The project website can be found at http://www.oaeproject.org. The project blog will be updated with the latest project news from time to time, and can be found at http://www.oaeproject.org/blog.

The mailing list used for Apereo OAE is oae@apereo.org. You can subscribe to the mailing list at https://groups.google.com/a/apereo.org/d/forum/oae.

Bugs and other issues can be reported in our issue tracker at https://github.com/oaeproject/3akai-ux/issues.

by Nicolaas Matthijs at August 27, 2014 01:14 PM