Planet Sakai

November 17, 2018

Michael Feldstein

Fall 2017 Top 30 Largest Online Enrollments In US – With LMS Usage and Trends Since 2012

The National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) and its Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) provide the most official data on colleges and universities in the United States. This is the sixth year of data on distance education enrollments, and we have an opportunity to view trends over time.

Let’s look at the top 30 online programs for Fall 2017 (in terms of total number of students taking at least one online course for grad and undergrad levels combined) in the US. Some notes on the data:

  • The first view combines the categories ‘students exclusively taking distance education courses’ and ‘students taking some but not all distance education courses’ to obtain the ‘at least one online course’ category; the second view shows just the ‘students exclusively taking distance education courses’.
  • Note that IPEDS captures distance education enrollment data based on Fall 20xx reports using a census date of October 15; this approach does not fully capture programs with multiple start dates throughout the year.
  • IPEDS tracks data based on the accredited body, which can differ for systems – this data has combined most for-profit systems into one institution entity as well as Arizona State University and a handful of not-for-profit systems that operate as one entity.
  • There is a new column this year showing changes in enrollment in each case between Fall 2012 and Fall 2017 data.
  • Both views highlight for-profit institutions in yellow and added sparklines to help visualize trends. There has been a wave of for-profits converting in one form or another of not-for-profit institutions (e.g. Grand Canyon University, Kaplan / Purdue Global), but these conversions for the most part had not taken place as of the Fall 2017 reporting period.
  • There is another new column this year showing which LMS is currently in usage at each of the schools listed, and in cases where there is a transition in 2018, both systems are shown with a direction > sign.
  • See this post for Fall 2017 profile by sector and state.

Largest 30 online enrollments in US

Looking at the case where students exclusively take online courses in a distance education (DE) mode, we see some differences in the list with a greater concentration of for-profit schools.

Top 30 distance ed institutions

Finally, it's worth looking at the top 30 trend over time. Obviously the University of Phoenix is no longer the 800 pound gorilla in distance education, with two not-for-profits - Western Governors University and Southern New Hampshire University - poised to overtake Phoenix in the next year or two. This view also shows the tendency for most institutions to top out at approximately 60,000 students, but this may be changing with the three counter-examples above as well as Grand Canyon University.

IPEDS Top 30 trend 2012-17

The post Fall 2017 Top 30 Largest Online Enrollments In US – With LMS Usage and Trends Since 2012 appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at November 17, 2018 06:46 PM

November 16, 2018

Apereo Foundation

UniTime Team Update: International Timetabling Competition 2019

UniTime Team Update: International Timetabling Competition 2019

We would like to announce a new university course timetabling competition. Building on the success of the earlier timetabling competitions, the International Timetabling Competition 2019 is aimed to motivate further research on complex university course timetabling problems coming from practice.

by Michelle Hall at November 16, 2018 07:47 PM

2019 Opencast Summit

2019 Opencast Summit

For the meeting taking place January 16-19, 2019 at ETH Zurich, the Opencast community is looking for contributions related to the use and management of video in academia. With a focus on Opencast, course capture, and video management, we are particularly keen to hear from educational technologists and designers, instructors, or service providers working with video to support teaching and learning.

by Michelle Hall at November 16, 2018 07:42 PM

Michael Feldstein

Fall 2017 IPEDS Data: New Profile of US Higher Ed Online Education

The National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) and its Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) provide the most official data on colleges and universities in the United States. I have been analyzing and sharing the data since the inaugural Fall 2012 dataset.

Below is a profile of online education in the US for degree-granting colleges and university, broken out by sector and for each state for the most recent, Fall 2017, data.

Please note the following:

  • There are multiple ways to filter and select data. For this set, I have limited to U.S. degree-granting institutions in six sectors - public 4-year, private 4-year, for profit 4-year, public 2-year, private 2-year, and for profit 2-year. For undergraduate totals I have included degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking students (degree-granting institutions can offer non-degree programs). Note that this will give different totals than what was reported in the NCES First Look report.
  • For the most part distance education and online education terms are interchangeable, but they are not equivalent as DE can include courses delivered by a medium other than the Internet (e.g. correspondence course).
  • I have provided some flat images as well as an interactive graphic at the bottom of the post. The interactive graphic has much better image resolution than the flat images.
  • There are two tabs below in the interactive graphic - the first shows totals for the US by sector and by level (grad, undergrad); the second shows a map view allowing filtering by sector.

Fall 2017 IPEDS data on distance education enrollment

Here is the map view of state data colored by number of, and percentage of, students taking at least one online class for each sector. If you hover over any state you can get the basic data. As an example, here is a view highlighting New Hampshire institutions.

Map view of IPEDS Fall 2017 DE data

Interactive Graphic

For those of you who have made it this far, below is the interactive graphic, which can also be found here. Enjoy the data.

<noscript><a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/mfeldstein/feed"><img alt=" " src="https://i1.wp.com/public.tableau.com/static/images/Fa/Fall2017IPEDSDEEnrollmentProfile-e-Literate/ProfilebySector/1_rss.png?ssl=1" style="border: none;" /></a></noscript>

The post Fall 2017 IPEDS Data: New Profile of US Higher Ed Online Education appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at November 16, 2018 01:57 AM

November 15, 2018

Michael Feldstein

OLC 2018 SoTL Panel Further Info

I'm going to be facilitating an Empirical Educator Project-relevant panel at OLC today at 11:15 AM in Oceanic 1, followed by an EEP and EEP-curious meetup at Soomo booth (#226) at 12:15 PM in the Expo Center. The rest of this post is just a little extra information on each of the SoTL work of the panel participants' home institutions, for those who attend the session.

CMU Eberly Center

At the intersection of faculty research, teaching, and service, the Eberly Center supports Teaching as Research. We help faculty answer compelling research questions regarding which teaching strategies are more effective at promoting learning, increasing engagement, and enhancing the learning environment. Our services provide the tools and expertise to help instructors develop research questions and study designs, identify valid and reliable data sources, analyze and interpret educational data, and present and publish research results. Read more about our research processes and findings in this site:

www.cmu.edu/teaching/teaching-as-research/index.html

UCF

At UCF, SoTL research is incentivized through an administrative Faculty Award that includes a $5,000 one-time award and a $5,000 addition to salary base. facultyexcellence.ucf.edu/recognition/scholarship-of-teaching-and-learning/

Support is provided by the UCF Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning and the Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness. RITE assists faculty, free of charge, with any SoTL activity within the research design to dissemination continuum.

CTU

CTU is a career-focused university encouraging the use of educational technology and SoTL research in the areas of professional scholarship and adaptive learning. Faculty (including adjunct faculty) can apply for funding through an internal website and faculty are encouraged to share their research and scholarship work with the university. Additionally, research collaboration with other institutions is supported and encouraged as demonstrated by the work with CTU and UCF.

Ole Miss Adaptive Learning SoTL Poster

http://cetl.wp2.olemiss.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/83/2018/04/Revised-Personalized-Learning-Poster.pdf

The post OLC 2018 SoTL Panel Further Info appeared first on e-Literate.

by Michael Feldstein at November 15, 2018 02:14 PM

Dr. Chuck

Putting Sakai Behind Cloudflare

I love Cloudflare.  I use it extensively for any production server I support.  I use it for https termination, DDOS mitigation, performance improvement for static content, super flexible DNS management and many more things.

In building my support for IMS LTI Advantage I decided I just needed a server that would run a particular tag or branch of Sakai in production for basic testing rather than pushing everything to master and waiting until the nightly server went through the rebuild.

Here are my notes on putting Sakai behind Cloudflare.

– In CloudFlare under “Overview” Make sure SSL is “Flexible” to keep CloudFlare talking on the backend on port 80

– In CloudFlare, under “Crypto” turn on “Always use HTTPS” and “Automatic HTTPS Rewrites”

– In the sakai server in the file ./apache-tomcat-8.0.30/conf/server.xml set up the connector like this

<Connector port="80" 
    protocol="HTTP/1.1"   
    connectionTimeout="20000" 
    scheme="https"  />

This runs an http (port 80) without requiring any key fussing.  Since Cloudflare does the SSL we don’t need it in Tomcat.   See https://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/config/http.html#SSL_Support

Interestingly, one thing I did not need to do was adjust the caching for the “/library” urls in Sakai.   Sakai sets all the headers so well that Cloudflare needs no further guidance and neither does the browser.  Just as a simple test, the actual un-cached download for the initial page in Sakai Prior to login is 8.8KB.  That is *KILO-BYTES*.  A normal post-login page in Sakai’s Lessons is 31.4 KB  data transferred. Amazingly low bandwidth usage for an enterprise application like Sakai.

Pretty cool.

by Charles Severance at November 15, 2018 04:55 AM

November 09, 2018

Apereo OAE

Apereo OAE Snowy Owl is now available!

The latest version of Apereo's Open Academic Environment (OAE) project has just been released! Version 15.0.0 is codenamed Snowy Owl and it includes some changes (mostly under the hood) in order to pave the way for what's to come. Read the full changelog at Github

Image taken from bird eden.

November 09, 2018 06:50 PM

November 08, 2018

Adam Marshall

H5P Improvements: LaTeX, Content Reuse and Copyright Handling

Those wonderful people at H5P have added some new features the most impressive of which is the integration of LaTeX into all content types (eg, drag and drop, multiple choice etc.)

If you want more information then you will find that the H5P Release Notes are very interesting.

You may also be interested in this previous blog post about H5P.

by Adam Marshall at November 08, 2018 05:03 PM

October 25, 2018

Adam Marshall

Introducing the new ‘Cabinet’ LTI tool

A new (external) tool called ‘Cabinet’ has been added to WebLearn. You can find it in the “Plugins” section of the “Manage Tools” page in “Site Info”.

Integrating Object, Image and Text in Oxford Teaching

Digital technologies are revolutionising our ability to integrate objects and images into university teaching. Cabinet has been developed to support teaching with objects and images in 2D and 3D, using a range of visual materials from Oxford’s GLAM collections and beyond.

Cabinet enables you to integrate text and object in the teaching process, providing full access to visual materials for study and revision

Objects and images used in lecture courses, handling sessions, classes, tutorials and seminars are uploaded onto Cabinet to give students the opportunity to review and revise materials alongside text. Cabinet supports both classroom and independent work through close study of high-resolution digitised course materials, and through interactive tools such as tagging and annotation of materials they encounter. The platform offers both a dynamic site for analysis and interaction, and a rich archive for the course module that enables its use by any teacher of the course.

Cabinet contains features allowing in-depth engagement with sources, including annotation of objects in 3D space, embedding of multimedia such as video and audio content, and the ability to post comments to stimulate online discussions about physical and textual study materials.

Cabinet is designed to be intuitive and flexible; it suits the learning preferences of digital natives, and also addresses the variety of teaching styles and time constraints of lecturers and tutors.

Papers can be of any size and can be organised by weeks, themes or other categories.

Both faculty members and museum curators are currently populating the site with courses from across all four Divisions of the University, and are actively experimenting with the platform. Initial feedback from students and lecturers is highly positive.

Cabinet is now supported by the Technology Enhanced Learning team, who offer full support in structuring the online course and in uploading course materials. The Cabinet team at the Oxford Internet Institute also welcome further enquiries from colleagues, and can offer some additional support such as 3D imaging.

Cabinet was originally developed by a team led by Oxford Internet Institute (OII), and funded through University’s IT Innovation Seed Fund (2015-16) and the GLAM Digital Content Board

 

Links

by Adam Marshall at October 25, 2018 01:54 PM

October 16, 2018

Dr. Chuck

Sakai-19 has MVP support for LTI 1.3 and LTI Advantage – Certification is coming soon

I am happy to announce today that Sakai’s master branch has minimum viable product (MVP) for all of the aspects of IMS LTI Advantage.  

We have this code in our code base before the specs are completed and before certification tests are available for LTI Advantage.  Because of the specs and certifications are not available/final, we cannot claim compliance to the specs at this time (October 2018) – all I am announcing at this time is that we have an initial, complete implementation that we will move into certification.

Sakai (and Tsugi) will help IMS test their certifications and reference implementations as they are rolled out and I expect we wil be certified as soon as the certifications are available.

http://www.imsglobal.org/lti-advantage-overview

In short LTI Advantage includes an OAuth 2.0 / JWT security model for launches and services, a names and roles service, and the ability for a tool to make create and manage their own grade book columns.

The LTI Advantage code is already included in Sakai-19.   Any issues identified during certification and interoperability testing with other vendors will be fixed using our normal fix-merge-and-minor-release process – so we will be able to field a 100% certified LTI Advantage implementation in Sakai-19 once IMS finalizes the specs and provides the certifications.

I am excited.   My feeling is the LTI Advantage will be as revolutionary as the initial LTI 1.1 was nearly a decade ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akDUM1SXMxE

All the other major LMS systems in the market are making good progress towards LTI Advantage by the end of the year and Sakai will have LTI advantage in the same timeframe as the rest of the market.

This will be a great development for Sakai – since the Advantage APIs cover such a broad scope and all major vendors will be implementing the full range of the APIs, it means that far richer LTI tools can be built without using proprietary LMS-specific extensions.   Other LMS vendors will push tools towards LTI 1.3 / Advantage by making it so that switching to LTI 1.3 is the only way to get access to certain capabilities.

Technical Details

If you are interested in the nerdy details of what it took to make it happen, you can look at the Sakai issue tracker:

https://jira.sakaiproject.org/browse/SAK-40533

The short summary is that while it took me four months to build LTI Advantage for Sakai, the new code is simpler and cleaner than the LTI 1.1 code and far simpler than the LTI 2.0 support in Sakai. As a comparison, I worked on LTI 2.0 in Sakai off and on for three years before it was completed.

Acknowledgements

It is important that I acknowledge the help, support and guidance by the other participants in the LTI Advantage process.   They know much more about this spec than I do and I was able to lean on them as I raced through my implementation and for that I am very thankful.

Thanks to: Claude Vervort / Cengage, Nathan Mills / Canvas, Karl Lloyd / Canvas, Eric Preston / Blackboard, Derek Haskins / IMS, James Risler / IMS, Martin Leonord / TurnItIn, Paul Gray / Learning Objects, and many others.

Making LTI Advantage work on a tight time schedule required an unprecedented trust and sharing of code and best practices between participants.

We knew we were all going to succeed together or fail separately and the the effort was large but also important and transformational.  I for one know I could never have done this without the help I received from the rest of the working group.   So my heartfelt thanks is in order.

by Charles Severance at October 16, 2018 02:03 PM

October 08, 2018

Adam Marshall

WebLearn and Turnitin Courses and User Group meetings: Michaelmas term 2018

IT Services offers a variety of taught courses to support the use of WebLearn and the plagiarism awareness software Turnitin. Course books for the WebLearn Fundamentals course (3 hours) can be downloaded for self study. Places are limited and bookings are required. All courses are free of charge.

Click on the links provided for further information and to book a place.

WebLearn 3-hour course:

Plagiarism awareness courses (Turnitin):

User Group meetings:

by Jill Fresen at October 08, 2018 03:44 PM

October 05, 2018

Dr. Chuck

Open Apereo 2019 – the Premier Conference for Open Source in Education

Open Apereo 2019 will take place at the Omni Los Angeles Hotel at California Plaza ( http://bit.ly/OpenApereo2019Hotel ) between Sunday June 2nd and Thursday June 6th 2019. Hold those dates!

Open Apereo has a growing reputation as a great conference for learning and networking around open source in education. What makes it great are the volunteers from the Apereo community that bring their priorities and vision into the planning process, ably supported by our outstanding conference planners, Concentra.

If you would like to participate in the planning of the conference, please contact Ian Dolphin of the Apereo Foundation (https://www.apereo.org/content/contact-and-mail-lists).

 

by Charles Severance at October 05, 2018 12:06 AM

September 27, 2018

Sakai Project

Sakai 12.4 maintenance is released!

Dear Community,

I'm pleased to announce on behalf of the worldwide community that Sakai 12.4 is released and available for downloading! 

Sakai 12.4 has 88 improvements including: 

  • 22 fixes in Assignments
  • 14 fixes in Gradebook
  • 9 fixes in Tests & Quizzes (Samigo)
  • 7 fixes in Lessons
  • 6 fixes in Roster
  • 5 fixes in Portal

For more information, visit 12.4 Fixes by Tool

by WHodges at September 27, 2018 06:11 PM

August 15, 2018

Sakai Project

Now Open! Call for Proposals for the Sakai Virtual Conference 2018

Sakai Project Logo

We are actively seeking presenters who are knowledgeable about teaching with Sakai. You don’t need to be a technical expert to share your experiences! Submit your proposal today! The deadline for submissions is September 21st, 2018.

Save the Date: The Sakai Virtual Conference will take place entirely online on Wednesday, November 7th.

by MHall at August 15, 2018 06:58 PM

August 13, 2018

Sakai Project

Sakai Community Survey - Number of Users at Your Institution

We would like your help in tallying up the total number of Sakai users worldwide.

by MHall at August 13, 2018 04:33 PM

July 04, 2018

Sakai@JU

F2F Course Site Content Import

If you’re tasked with teaching an upcoming course that you’ve taught in the past with the University – there’s no need to rebuild everything from scratch – unless you want to.

Faculty teaching face to face (F2F) courses can benefit from the course content import process in Site Info. This process allows you to pull in all your assignments, syllabus, gradebook, handouts and other files associated with the course – as used in a previous offering of the course.

To do this, you need to be an instructor in both course sites (the former and the upcoming). Go to the upcoming course site, and select Site Info>Import from Site:

importfromsite

Next, select the kind of import you wish to perform. I typically suggest using the replacement option “I would like to replace my data”. On the next screen select which course you’d like to pull content in FROM.  Be careful here making sure you select the SOURCE of the content you’ll import. Next click Continue.

On the next screen select the tools/areas of content you wish to import. Keep in mind it’s always a good idea to import the Resources, because files referred to in Assignments, Quizzes, Lessons or Announcements could refer to those files, and in order for those links to work properly the corresponding resources must be likewise imported.

Finally complete the import process and watch for the email to be sent to you – notifying you of the import process being completed. You can find out more information about the process here.

Want to watch the whole process in real time? Take a gander here:

by Dave E. at July 04, 2018 06:56 PM

June 11, 2018

Apereo OAE

Strategic re-positioning: OAE in the world of NGDLE

The experience of the Open Academic Environment Project (OAE) forms a significant practical contribution to the emerging vision of the ‘Next Generation Digital Learning Environment’, or NGDLE. Specifically, OAE contributes core collaboration tools and services that can be used in the context of a class, of a formal or informal group outside a class, and indeed of such a group outside an institution. This set of tools and services leverages academic infrastructure, such as Access Management Federations, or widely used commercial infrastructure for authentication, open APIs for popular third-party software (e.g. video conference) and open standards such as LTI and xAPI.

Beyond the LMS/VLE

OAE is widely used by staff in French higher education in the context of research and other inter-institutional collaboration. The project is now examining future directions which bring OAE closer to students – and to learning. This is driven by a groundswell among learners. There is strong anecdotal evidence that students in France are chafing at the constraints of the LMS/VLE. They are beginning to use social media – not necessarily with adequate data or other safeguards – to overcome the perceived limitations of the LMS/VLE. The core functionality of OAE – people forming groups to collaborate around content – provides a means of circumventing the LMS’s limitations without selling one’s soul – or one’s data – to the social media giants. OAE embodies key capabilities supporting social and unstructured learning, and indeed could be adapted and configured as a ‘student owned environment’: a safe space for sharing and discussion of ideas leading to organic group activities. The desires and requirements of students have not featured strongly in NGDLE conversations to this point: The OAE project, beginning with work in France, will explore student discontent with the LMS, and seek to work together with LMS solution providers and software communities to provide a richer and more engaging experience for learners.

Integration points and data flows

OAE has three principal objectives in this area:

  1. OAE has a basic (uncertified) implementation of the IMSGlobal Learning Tools Interoperability specification. This will be enriched to further effect integration with the LMS/VLE where it is required. OAE will not assume such integration is required without evidence. It will not drive such integration on the basis of technical feasibility, but by needs expressed by learners and educators.
  2. Driven by the significant growth of usage of the Karuta ePortfolio software in France, OAE will explore how student-selected evidence of competency can easily be provided for Karuta, and what other connections might be required or desirable between the two systems.
  3. Given the growth of interest in learning analytics in France and globally, OAE will become an exemplary emitter of learning analytics data and will act wherever possible to analyse each new or old feature from a designed analytics perspective. Learning analytics data will flow from learning designs embedded in OAE, not simply be the accidental output that constitutes a technical log file.

OAE is continuing to develop and transform its sustainability model. The change is essentially from a model based primarily on financially-based contributions to that of a mixed mode community-based model, where financial contributions are encouraged alongside individual, institutional and organisational volunteered contributions of code, documentation and other non-code artefacts. There are two preconditions for accomplishing this. The first, which applies specifically to code, is clearing a layer of technical debt in order to more easily encourage and facilitate contributions around modern software frameworks and tools. OAE is committed to paying down this debt and encouraging contributions from developers outside the project.

The second is both more complex and more straightforward; straightforward to describe, but complex to realise. Put simply, answers to questions around wasteful duplication of resources in deploying software in education have fallen out of balance with reality. The pendulum has swung from “local” through “cloud first” to “cloud only”. Innovation around learning, which by its very nature often begins locally, is often stifled by the industrial-style massification of ‘the hosted LMS’ which emphasises conformity with a single model. As a result of this strategy, institutions have switched from software development and maintenance to contract management. In many cases, this means that they have tended to swap creative, problem-solving capability for an administrative capability. It is almost as though e-learning has entered a “Fordist” phase, with only the green shoots of LTI enabled niche applications and individual institutional initiatives providing hope of a rather more postmodern – and flexible - future.

OAE retains its desire and ambition to provide a scalable solution that remains “cloud ready”. The project believes, however, that the future is federated. Patchworks of juridical and legal frameworks across national and regional boundaries alone – particularly around privacy - should drive a reconsideration of “cloud only” as a strategy for institutions with global appetites. Institutions with such appetites – and there are few now which do not have them – will distribute, federate and firewall systems to work around legislative roadblocks, bumps in the road, and brick walls. OAE will, then, begin to consider and work on inter-host federation of content and other services. This will, of necessity, begin small. It will, however, remain the principled grit in the strategic oyster. As more partners join the project, OAE will start designing a federation architectural layer that will lay the foundation to a scenario where OAE instances dynamically exchange data among themselves in a seamless and efficient way according to a variety of use cases.

ID 22-MAY-18 Amended 23-MAY-18

June 11, 2018 12:00 PM

May 01, 2018

Sakai@JU

Will Sakai look different following the upgrade?

While there are some improvements to accessibility and some on-going tweaks to improve color contrast issues, the upgrade to Sakai will not affect the overall appearance that much.  For mobile users – the difference in course navigation will be much-improved.

Desktop/Laptop view:

Sakai 11
Sakai - Pre Upgrade Desktop View

Following Upgrade:
Sakai - Post Upgrade Desktop View

Mobile view (Sakai 11/Post-Upgrade):
Sakai - Pre Upgrade Mobile View  Sakai - Post Upgrade Mobile View

More detail will be distributed in the coming weeks and those following the upgrade.

by Dave E. at May 01, 2018 07:53 PM

Gradebook Calculation Anomoly

In what appears to be a gradebook calculation anomaly, be sure items are categorized appropriately even if you course is only using categories for organization – otherwise final course grade calculations may be inaccurate – as the following video explains.

 

To address categorization of an item, check the Gradebook>Settings>Categories and Weighting to insure you’ve setup the gradebook correctly (specific to each course).  Next insure all items which have bearing on the overall grade are INCLUDED in the course grade calculation – making sure they DO NOT have a calculator with a slash through it AND that they are not in an uncategorized category:

edititemdetailsgradebookuncategorized

by Dave E. at May 01, 2018 06:23 PM