Planet Sakai

December 20, 2014

Michael Feldstein

e-Literate Top 20 Posts For 2014

I typically don’t write year-end reviews or top 10 (or 20) lists, but I need to work on our consulting company finances. At this point, any distraction seems more enjoyable than working in QuickBooks.

We’ve had a fun year at e-Literate, and one recent change is that we are now more willing break stories when appropriate. We typically comment on ed tech stories a few days after the release, providing analysis and commentary, but there are several cases where we felt a story needed to go public. In such cases (e.g. Unizin creation, Cal State Online demise, management changes at Instructure and Blackboard) we tend to break the news objectively, providing mostly descriptions and explanations, allowing others to provide commentary.

The following list is based on Jetpack stats on WordPress, which does not capture people who read posts through RSS feeds (we send out full articles through the feed). So the stats have a bias towards people who come to e-Literate for specific articles rather than our regular readers. We also tend to get longer-term readership of articles over many months, so this list also has a bias for articles posted a while ago.

With that in mind, here are the top 20 most read articles on e-Literate in terms of page views for the past 12 months along with publication date.

  1. Can Pearson Solve the Rubric’s Cube? (Dec 2013) – This article proves that people are willing to read a 7,000 word post published on New Year’s Eve.
  2. A response to USA Today article on Flipped Classroom research (Oct 2013) – This article is our most steady one, consistently getting around 100 views per day.
  3. Unizin: Indiana University’s Secret New “Learning Ecosystem” Coalition (May 2014) – This is the article where we broke the story about Unizin, based largely on a presentation at Colorado State University.
  4. Blackboard’s Big News that Nobody Noticed (Jul 2014) – This post commented on the Blackboard users’ conference and some significant changes that got buried in the keynote and much of the press coverage.
  5. Early Review of Google Classroom (Jul 2014) – Meg Tufano got pilot access to the new system and allowed me to join the testing; this article mostly shares Meg’s findings.
  6. Why Google Classroom won’t affect institutional LMS market … yet (Jun 2014) – Before we had pilot access to the system, this article described the likely market affects from Google’s new system.
  7. Competency-Based Education: An (Updated) Primer for Today’s Online Market (Dec 2013) – Given the sudden rise in interest in CBE, this article updated a 2012 post explaining the concept.
  8. The Resilient Higher Ed LMS: Canvas is the only fully-established recent market entry (Feb 2014) – Despite all the investment in ed tech and market entries, this article noted how stable the LMS market is.
  9. Why VCs Usually Get Ed Tech Wrong (Mar 2014) – This post combined references to “selling Timex knockoffs in Times Square” with a challenge to the application of disruptive innovation.
  10. New data available for higher education LMS market (Nov 2013) – This article called out the Edutechnica and ListEdTech sites with their use of straight data (not just sampling surveys) to clarify the LMS market.
  11. InstructureCon: Canvas LMS has different competition now (Jun 2014) – This was based on the Instructure users’ conference and the very different attitude from past years.
  12. Dammit, the LMS (Nov 2014) – This rant called out how the LMS market is largely following consumer demand from faculty and institutions.
  13. Why Unizin is a Threat to edX (May 2014) – This follow-on commentary tried to look at what market effects would result from Unizin introduction.
  14. State of the Anglosphere’s Higher Education LMS Market: 2013 Edition (Nov 2013) – This was last year’s update of the LMS squid graphic.
  15. Google Classroom: Early videos of their closest attempt at an LMS (Jun 2014) – This article shared early YouTube videos showing people what the new system actually looked like.
  16. State of the US Higher Education LMS Market: 2014 Edition (Oct 2014) – This was this year’s update of the LMS squid graphic.
  17. About Michael – How big is Michael’s fan club?
  18. What is a Learning Platform? (May 2012) – The old post called out and helped explain the general move from monolithic systems to platforms.
  19. What Faculty Should Know About Adaptive Learning (Dec 2013) – This was a reprint of invited article for American Federation of Teachers.
  20. Instructure’s CTO Joel Dehlin Abruptly Resigns (Jul 2014) – Shortly after the Instructure users’ conference, Joel resigned from the company.

Well that was more fun that financial reporting!

The post e-Literate Top 20 Posts For 2014 appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at December 20, 2014 06:17 PM

December 18, 2014

Michael Feldstein

Helix Education puts their competency-based LMS up for sale

Back in September I wrote about the Helix LMS providing an excellent view into competency-based education and how learning platforms would need to be designed differently for this mode. The traditional LMS – based on a traditional model using grades, seat time and synchronous cohort of students – is not easily adapted to serve CBE needs such as the following:

  1. Explicit learning outcomes with respect to the required skills and concomitant proficiency (standards for assessment)
  2. A flexible time frame to master these skills
  3. A variety of instructional activities to facilitate learning
  4. Criterion-referenced testing of the required outcomes
  5. Certification based on demonstrated learning outcomes
  6. Adaptable programs to ensure optimum learner guidance

In a surprise move, Helix Education is putting the LMS up for sale. Helix Education provided e-Literate the following statement to explain the changes, at least from a press release perspective.

With a goal of delivering World Class technologies and services, a change we are making is with Helix LMS. After thoughtful analysis and discussion, we have decided to divest (sell) Helix LMS. We believe that the best way for Helix to have a positive impact on Higher Education is to:

  • Be fully committed and invest properly in core “upstream” technologies and services that help institutions aggregate, analyze and act upon data to improve their ability to find, enroll and retain students and ensure their success
  • Continue to build and share our thought leadership around TEACH – program selection, instructional design and faculty engagement for CBE, on-campus, online and hybrid delivery modes.
  • Be LMS neutral and support whichever platform our clients prefer. In fact, we already have experience in building CBE courses in the top three LMS solutions.

There are three aspects of this announcement that are quite interesting to me.

Reversal of Rebranding

Part of the surprise is that Helix rebranded the company based on their acquisition of the LMS – this was not just a simple acquisition of a learning platform – and just over a year after this event Helix Education is reversing course, selling the Helix LMS and going LMS-neutral. From the earlier blog post [emphasis added]:

In 2008 Altius Education, started by Paul Freedman, worked with Tiffin University to create a new entity called Ivy Bridge College. The goal of Ivy Bridge was to help students get associate degrees and then transfer to a four-year program. Altius developed the Helix LMS specifically for this mission. All was fine until the regional accrediting agency shut down Ivy Bridge with only three months notice.

The end result was that Altius sold the LMS and much of the engineering team to Datamark in 2013. Datamark is an educational services firm with a focus on leveraging data. With the acquisition of the Helix technology, Datamark could expand into the teaching and learning process, leading them to rebrand as Helix Education – a sign of the centrality of the LMS to the company’s strategy. Think of Helix Education now as an OSP (a la carte services that don’t require tuition revenue sharing) with an emphasis on CBE programs.

Something must have changed in their perception of the market to cause this change in direction. My guess is that they are getting pushback from schools who insist on keeping their institutional LMS, even with the new CBE programs. Helix states they have worked with “top three LMS solutions”, but as seen in the demo (read the first post for more details), capabilities such as embedding learning outcomes throughout a course and providing a flexible time frame work well outside the core design assumptions of a traditional LMS. I have yet to see an elegant design for CBE with a traditional LMS. I’m open to being convinced otherwise, but count me as skeptical.

Upstream is Profitable

The general move sounds like the main component is the moving “upstream” element. To be more accurate, it’s more a matter of staying “upstream” and choosing to not move downstream. It’s difficult, and not always profitable, to deal with implementing academic programs. Elements built on enrollment and retention are quite honestly much more profitable. Witness the recent sale of the enrollment consulting firm Royall & Company for $850 million.

The Helix statement describes their TEACH focus as one of thought leadership. To me this sounds like the core business will be on enrollment, retention and data analysis while they focus academic efforts not on direct implementation products and services, but on white papers and presentations.

Meaning for Market

Helix Education was not the only company building CBE-specific learning platforms to replace the traditional LMS. FlatWorld Knowledge built a platform that is being used at Brandman University. LoudCloud Systems built a new CBE platform FASTrak – and they already have a traditional LMS (albeit one designed with a modern architecture). Perhaps most significantly, the CBE pioneers Western Governors University and Southern New Hampshire University’s College for America (CfA) built custom platforms based on CRM technology (i.e. Salesforce) based on their determination that the traditional LMS market did not suit their specific needs. CfA even spun off their learning platform as a new company – Motivis Learning.

If Helix Education is feeling the pressure to be LMS-neutral, does that mean that these other companies are or will be facing the same? Or, is Helix Education’s decision really based on company profitability and capabilities that are unique to their specific situation?

The other side of the market effect will be determined by which company buys the Helix LMS. Will a financial buyer (e.g. private equity) choose to create a standalone CBE platform company? Will a traditional LMS company buy the Helix LMS to broaden their reach in the quickly-growing CBE space (350 programs in development in the US)? Or will an online service provider and partial competitor of Helix Education buy the LMS? It will be interesting to see which companies bid on this product line and who wins.

Overall

If I find out more about what this change in direction means for Helix Education or for competency-based programs in general, I’ll share in future posts.

The post Helix Education puts their competency-based LMS up for sale appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at December 18, 2014 11:05 PM

Adam Marshall

Improved Student Feedback Within WebLearn

After the successful trial in Michaelmas Term, the 2015 IT Innovation Seed Fund challenges are now live. The termly call for Staff focuses on student feedback which is of particular interest to the WebLearn community. (There is also an ‘Open’ category: innovative digital proposals that would improve the academic experience at Oxford.)

From https://oxfordideas.wazoku.com/: “Responding to student feedback: Through our institution-wide annual surveys, students tell us that they do not fully understand the criteria by which they are assessed, and do not have feedback that is useful in helping them to improve their work in relation to those criteria. We would like to see innovative projects that aim to improve these aspects of learning.”

This is your chance to get your idea funded. Projects can be of any size from a few hundred pounds upwards but cannot exceed £100k, and can last for up to 12 months.

We would be very interested in discussing possible projects with interested parties; if you are interested in submitting a bid to enhance WebLearn then please get in touch with us via the usual channels.

IT Services are using an ‘open innovation’ process so the first step is to register on the site, read the challenge, and submit your idea or comment on others. Even if you do not have a project idea in mind you can offer to help other people with theirs. The open innovation stage will be open until 14th February 2015 after which we will select a few ideas to go forward to formal project proposals and possibly funding.

IT Services are also launching the annual Student IT Innovation Fund in collaboration with OUSU (open to all Oxford students to get funding for digital projects over the long vacation) so please feel free to pass on this information.

by Adam Marshall at December 18, 2014 11:54 AM

December 16, 2014

Dr. Chuck

Idea: Split Secrets for OAuth

We are talking about ways to establish shared secrets where both the Tool Consumer and Tool Provider contribute key material to an overall shared key used to sign and validate OAuth messages. Often these “secrets” are treated as strings of varying length. Common practice is to choose random numbers wih something like the uniq() PHP function or Java’s UUID() and then hex encode the random bits for strings of varying length.

Using the current approach, (a) we cannot assume the serialization of this data and (b) the secrets can be of effectively any length (short or long). By not specifing an encoding that allows us to transmit bit-level randomness, we implicitly shorten key lengths by using a non-predictable encoding so we have to fall back to strings and likely strings with a very limited character set.

We have not yet seen situations where secrets include non-Latin1 characters. As we move to moving secrets across web services – serialization becomes inclreasingly important and if we get too tricky with character sets we might find ourselves with some interoperability problems.

My proposal is to define the binary bit-length of the two halves of the “split secret” and insist that these are serialized using a known serialization so both sides can de-serialize these pieces to cryptographically strong secrets with a well understood bit length.

So each of the sides contributes 512 cryptographically random bits to the shared secret. When each side communicates the secret – they are serialized and transferred using 128-character hex encoded using only lower case letters for a-f. An example of a half-secret is as follows:

941c7f8f929ad915b0a8810a6eedee5e5a5cedbab1bee5e4e2f05df6ed926e8042bca5127a7fac88ab581526e78b193b99fdfe234d40496eca32431447b752af

To form the OAuth consumer secret the two hex halves are just concatenated as hex strings. Since the OAuth signing simply appends the key to the message and computes a digest, we can make use of all 1024 bits of randomness by using a 256 character hex-encoded key. While this means that the pad has a known character set (0-9) and (a-f) – it makes up for that by being 4 times longer. Also we avoid any encoding problems if we allow non-latin1 characters in the OAuth shared secret.

By speicfing the bit length and encoding – both sides can build database models that store secrets in fixed length fields.

By insuring there are 1024-bits of cryptographically strong randomness – other uses like sending data between the sides with two-way encryption approaches like Blowfish or AES can create shorter bit length keys from the known 1024-bits of randomness.

I am just putting this up because I like openness in the design of any security scheme in case I made any mistakes or incorrect assumptions.

This design is not at all final – comments are very welcome.

by Charles Severance at December 16, 2014 11:03 PM

Michael Feldstein

Blackboard’s SVP of Product Development Gary Lang Resigns

Gary Lang, Blackboard’s senior vice president in charge of product development and cloud operations, has announced his resignation and plans to join Amazon. Gary took the job with Blackboard in June 2013 and, along with CEO Jay Bhatt and SVP of Product Management Mark Strassman, formed the core management team that had worked together previously at AutoDesk. Gary led the reorganization effort to bring all product development under one organization, a core component of Blackboard’s recent strategy.

Michael described Blackboard’s new product moves toward cloud computing and an entirely new user experience (UX) for the Learn LMS, and Gary was the executive in charge of these efforts. These significant changes have yet to fully roll out to customers (public cloud in pilot, new UX about to enter pilot). Gary was also added to the IMS Global board of directors in July 2014 – I would expect this role to change as well given the move to Amazon.

At the same time, VP Product Management / VP Market Development Brad Koch has also resigned from Blackboard.[1] Brad came to Blackboard from the ANGEL acquisition. Given his long-term central role leading product definition and being part of Ray Henderson’s team[2], Brad’s departure will also have a big impact. Brad’s LinkedIn page shows that he has left Blackboard, but it does not yet show his new company. I’m holding off reporting until I can get public confirmation.

Blackboard provided the following statement from CEO Jay Bhatt.

The decision to leave Blackboard for an opportunity with Amazon was a personal one for Gary that allows him to return home to the West Coast. During his time here, Gary has made significant contributions to the strategic direction of Blackboard and the technology we deliver to customers. The foundation he has laid, along with other leaders on our product development team, will allow us to continue to drive technical excellence for years to come. We thank him for his leadership and wish him luck as he embarks on this new endeavor.

  1. The two resignations are unrelated as far as I can tell.
  2. Starting at Pearson, then at ANGEL, finally at Blackboard

The post Blackboard’s SVP of Product Development Gary Lang Resigns appeared first on e-Literate.

by Phil Hill at December 16, 2014 06:46 PM

December 12, 2014

Sakai@UD

Submitting final grades to UDSIS

As the semester comes to an end, it’s time to submit your final grades to UDSIS. In addition to the regular process described on the Registrar’s Web site, Sakai users can use a Web form titled Grade Submission from Sakai to UDSIS A couple of caveats regarding the use of the Web form: 1. Must […] more >

by Mathieu Plourde at December 12, 2014 02:35 PM

December 11, 2014

Sakai Project

Registration for the 5th International Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK) conference is now open!

The Society for Learning Analytics Research (SoLAR) and Marist College are pleased to announce that registration for the 5th International Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK) conference is now open!

December 11, 2014 06:30 PM

Open Apereo 2015 Call for Proposals

Open Apereo 2015 - Higher Education... 
Open Source in a New Age
Baltimore, MD | May 31-June 4, 2015

 
The Open Apereo Conference is designed to be an international, inclusive event, providing opportunities for community members to:

December 11, 2014 01:31 AM

December 05, 2014

Adam Marshall

WebLearn unavailable on Tuesday 9th December 2014 from 7-9am

cisco-routerWebLearn will be taken off-line on Tuesday 9th December for essential system maintenance. There will be no service during this period.

We apologise for any inconvenience that this essential work may cause.

by Adam Marshall at December 05, 2014 11:51 AM

Call for Entries: 2015 Teaching with Sakai (aka WebLearn) Innovation Award

apereo-logo

Announcement from the TWISA Committee

The Sakai Teaching and Learning community is seeking submissions for the 2015 Teaching With Sakai Innovation Award (TWSIA) competition. The award recognizes innovation and excellence in technology-supported teaching, academic collaboration, and student engagement.

We look forward to entries from those using the Sakai CLE (known locally as WebLearn).

Award categories include:

  • Higher Education: Face-to-Face
  • Higher Education: Fully On-line or Hybrid Course
  • Project Sites & Alternative Uses of Sakai

This year, the selection process will consist of two phases.

Phase 1:Optional abstract submission for feedback and preliminary review

Opening Date:  Dec 4, 2014. Deadline: Jan 15, 2015

Each applicant will submit a brief description of his/her project and of the innovative teaching method, practice or strategy to be considered for the final award.

Applicants will receive feedback on their abstracts, from the TWSIA committee, by Jan 30, 2015.

Participation in Phase 1 is not required for participation in Phase 2, however, the three questions on the abstract submission form will help applicants when they move on to the full application process.

Those who submit a preliminary abstract can incorporate feedback from the TWSIA committee in their final application.

To submit an abstract, please use the optional abstract submission form (http://tinyurl.com/q8p5o2c).

Phase 2: Final submission (required of all applicants)

Opening Date: Dec 3, 2014. Deadline: March 20, 2015

Each applicant will submit an in-depth description of the innovative teaching method, practice or strategy and indicate how it addresses the award criteria.  Application forms and information on award categories, a definition of innovation, criteria and rubrics are at: http://www.apereo.org/twsia

Winners will be announced in early April 2015 and recognized at the Open Apereo 2015 Conference in Baltimore MD.  Conference dates are May 31 to June 3, 2015.

Registration and travel expenses may be available for award winners.

Contact: Salwa Khan, TWSIA Committee Chair at sk16@txstate.edu

by Adam Marshall at December 05, 2014 11:43 AM

December 04, 2014

Sakai Project

TWSIA Submissions for 2015 Now Open

The Sakai Teaching and Learning community is seeking submissions for the 2015 Teaching With Sakai Innovation Award (TWSIA) competition. The award recognizes innovation and excellence in technology-supported teaching, academic collaboration, and student engagement. We look forward to entries from those using the Sakai CLE and the Apereo OAE (Open Academic Environment).

December 04, 2014 04:59 PM

November 26, 2014

Dr. Chuck

Tracing History from to “Imitation Game” to the Modern-Day Internet (#IHTS)

In a sense Alan Turing’s cryptography, code breaking and computer science work at Bletchley Park featured in the Imitation Game movie was the kickoff for the modern day Internet and well as modern day electronic computing technologies. For the first time in history, communication was essential for survival and applying computation to understanding communication was critical to success or failure in World War II. There was unprecedented funding poured into research into mathematics, computer science, social science, linguistics, and many other fields. Bletchley Park was one of the world’s first great large-scale cross-disciplinary research labs. The creativity and innovation at Bletchley Park had a tremendous impact on the results of World War II and the shape of our world to the present day.

If you are interested in learning how we got from Bletchley Park to today’s Internet – I would invite you to attend my free self-paced Internet History, Technology, and Security course on Coursera.

IHTS was one of the first 20 pioneering MOOCs as Coursera was rolled out in 2012 (yes two years seems like a long time ago). And now IHTS is one of the first Coursera courses to pioneer a new self-paced format that allows students to start and take courses at any time and at their own pace.

We initially have soft-launched IHTS so students can view all of the lectures and supplementary materials. Over the coming months, we will be adding quizzes and other assessments so that the self-paced offering includes all the features of the previous scheduled cohort based offerings on Coursera – except with no deadlines :).

The course is a mix of lectures and interviews with Internet innovators. All of the course materials are open and available under a CC-BY Creative Commons License to allow reuse of the lecture materials.

I hope to see you in class.

by Charles Severance at November 26, 2014 10:45 AM

November 24, 2014

Steve Swinsburg

Movember 2014

It’s the tail end of Movember, just a few days to go and my team has almost raised raised over a thousand bucks for the Movember Foundation!

What is Movember you ask? It’s about raising awareness for men’s health issues like depression, testicular cancer and prostate cancer. In Australia, the life expectancy of men is 5 years less than for women, 50% of men struggle with mental health issues at some point, and 50% of men will be diagnosed with cancer by age 85.

50%.

1 in 2.

Either you or me.

Fuck that.

I’ve been doing Movember for the past 6 years to try to tackle this issue and have raised a few grand in doing so. This year I setup a team with my work mates and we’ve collectively raised over $1000 already, with more donations promised this week. Our original goal was $1000, with your help we can make it $1500.

All donations are tax deductible  and you can donate here:
https://www.movember.com/au/donate/payment/member_id/51531/

Here’s a pic of my latest Mo efforts for your viewing pleasure. You can see past Movember efforts on my Movember page.

movember_20141124

by steveswinsburg at November 24, 2014 10:56 AM

November 10, 2014

Dr. Chuck

Riding My Way Back – Veterans Day – And my own Big-Screen Film Debut

Tomorrow is Veterans Day and I will be attending a film screening of “Riding My Way Back” Tuesday November 11 at 7PM at the Celebration Cinema in South Lansing.

Riding My Way Back (http://www.ridingmywayback.com) is a documentary film about a veteran who came back from Iraq and Afghanistan with with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and how his relationship with a horse named “Fred” helped him rebuild his life.

In addition to Riding My Way Back, we will be showing “CHUM Families” which is a documentary about parents and children that are part of the C.H.U.M. Therapeutic Riding family. I produced the film and it if the first time any of my work will be shown on a big screen cinema.

Here is a preview of the CHUM Families movie on YouTube.

The proceeds for the showing will go to support the programs at C.H.U.M. Therapeutic Riding (www.chumtherapy.net).

I hope to see you there.

by Charles Severance at November 10, 2014 05:52 PM

October 29, 2014

Steve Swinsburg

Sakai Wicket Maven Archetype updated and released to Maven Central

The Sakai Wicket Maven Archetype has been updated to the latest version of Wicket 6 and styling issues fixed for the latest Sakai portal. It’s also been released to Maven central.

The Sakai Wicket Maven Archetype allows you to generate a sample Sakai app via a single Maven command. The app demonstrates how to get a Sakai tool styled, internationalised and registered, setup your own APIs, wire them up with Spring and inject them via annotations. The app also also includes multi database support via Spring JDBC. It could easily be used as a base for a real tool.

Generate an app:

mvn archetype:generate -DarchetypeGroupId=org.sakaiproject.maven-archetype -DarchetypeArtifactId=sakai-wicket-maven-archetype -DarchetypeVersion=1.5.0 -DgroupId=org.sakaiproject.example -DartifactId=exampleApp

More info here:

https://confluence.sakaiproject.org/display/BOOT/Sakai+Wicket+Maven+Archetype

by steveswinsburg at October 29, 2014 07:46 PM

September 30, 2014

Ian Boston

AppleRAID low level fix

Anyone who uses AppleRAID will know how often it declares that a perfectly healthy disk is no longer a valid member of a Raid set. What you may not have experienced is when it wont rebuild. For a stripped set, the practical only solution is a backup. For a mirror there are some things you can do. Typically when diskutil or the GUI wont repair the low level AppleRAID.kext wont load, or will load and fails reporting it cant get a controller object. In the logs you might also see the Raid set is degraded or just offline. If its really bad DiskUtility and diskutil will hang somewhere in the kernel, and you wont be able to get a clean reboot.

Here is one way to fix:

Unplug the disk subsystem causing the problem.

Reboot, you may have to pull the plug to get shutdown.

Once up, move the AppleRAID.kext into a safe place eg

mkdir ~/kext
sudo mv /System/Library/Extensions/AppleRAID.kext ~/kext

Watch the logs to see that kextcache has rebuilt the cache of kernel extensions. You should see something like

30/09/2014 13:21:37.518 com.apple.kextcache[456]: /: helper partitions appear up to date.

When you see that you know that if you plugin the RAID Subsystem the kernel wont be able to load the AppleRAID.kext and so you will be able to manipulate the disks.

Plugin the raid subsystem and check that it didnt load the kernel extension,

kextstat | grep AppleRAID

You will now be able to do diskutil list and you should see your disks listed as Apple RAID disks, eg

$ diskutil list
...
/dev/disk2
 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
 0: GUID_partition_scheme *750.2 GB disk2
 1: EFI 209.7 MB disk2s1
 2: Apple_RAID 749.8 GB disk2s2
 3: Apple_Boot Boot OS X 134.2 MB disk2s3
/dev/disk3
 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER
 0: GUID_partition_scheme *750.2 GB disk3
 1: EFI 209.7 MB disk3s1
 2: Apple_RAID 749.8 GB disk3s2
 3: Apple_Boot Boot OS X 134.2 MB disk3s3


At this point the disks are just plain disks. The AppleRAID kernel extension isn’t managing the disks. Verify with

$ diskutil appleRAID list
No AppleRAID sets found
$

Since you cant use them as RAID any more, and so cant use the diskutil appleRAID delete command convert the RAID set into normal disks you have to trick OSX into mounting the disks. To do this you need to edit the partition table, without touching the data on the disk. You can do this with gpt

$ sudo gpt show disk2
start size index contents
0 1 PMBR
1 1 Pri GPT header
2 32 Pri GPT table
34 6
40 409600 1 GPT part - C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B
409640 1464471472 2 GPT part - 52414944-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1464881112 262144 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1465143256 7
1465143263 32 Sec GPT table
1465143295 1 Sec GPT header
$ sudo gpt show disk3
start size index contents
0 1 PMBR
1 1 Pri GPT header
2 32 Pri GPT table
34 6
40 409600 1 GPT part - C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B
409640 1464471472 2 GPT part - 52414944-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1464881112 262144 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC
1465143256 7
1465143263 32 Sec GPT table
1465143295 1 Sec GPT header
$

According to https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/technotes/tn2166/_index.html the partition in index 2 with a partition type of 52414944-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC is a Apple_RAID partition. Its actually HFS+ with some other settings. Those settings get removed when converting it form RAID to non RAID, but to get it mounted we can just change the partition type. First delete the entry from the partion table, then recreated it with the HFS+ type exactly the same size.

$ gpt remove -i 2 disk2
disk2s2 removed
$ gpt add -b 409640 -s 1464471472 -t 48465300-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC disk3
disk2s2 added

OSX will mount the disk. It will probably tell you that its been mounted read only, and cant be repaired. At the point you need to copy all the data off onto a clean disk, using rsync.

Once that is done you can do the same with the second disk and compare the differences between both your RAID members. When you have all the data back, you can consider if you leave the AppleRAID.kext disabled or use it again. I know what I will be doing.

by Ian at September 30, 2014 01:29 PM

September 26, 2014

Steve Swinsburg

TextWrangler filters to tidy XML and tidy JSON

I work with XML and JSON a lot, often as the input to or output from web services. Generally it is unformatted, so before I can read the data I need it formatted and whitespaced. So here are some TextWrangler filters to tidy up XML and JSON documents.

#!/bin/sh
XMLLINT_INDENT=$'\t' xmllint --format --encode utf-8 -

Save this into a file called Tidy XML.sh

#!/usr/bin/python
import fileinput
import json
print json.dumps( json.loads(''.join([line.strip() for line in fileinput.input()])), sort_keys=True, indent=2)

Save this into a file called Tidy JSON.py

Drop these into ~/Library/Application Support/TextWranger/Text Filters. You can then run them on a file within TextWrangler by choosing Text > Apply Text Filter > [filter].

by steveswinsburg at September 26, 2014 12:31 AM

September 25, 2014

Apereo OAE

Apereo OAE Heron is now available!

The Apereo Open Academic Environment (OAE) project team is extremely proud to announce the next major release of the Apereo Open Academic Environment; OAE Heron or OAE 9.

OAE Heron is a landmark release that introduces the long awaited folders functionality, allowing for sets of content items to be collected, organised, shared and curated. OAE Heron also provides full support for Shibboleth access management federations and brings improvements to activities, (email) notifications and the REST API documentation. Next to that, OAE Heron also ships with a wide range of overall usability improvements.

Changelog

Folders

Using the personal and group libraries, Apereo OAE has always allowed collaboration to grow organically, reflecting how most of our collaborations work in real life. Individual content items could be shared with people and groups, making those items available in their respective libraries. This has always tested extremely well in usability testing, and not requiring the organisation of items upfront has been considered to reduce the obstacles to collaboration.

However, sustained usage and usability testing have also highlighted a number of challenges with this approach. First of all, it was difficult to group items that logically belong together (e.g. a set of field trip pictures) and share and interact with them as a single unit. Next to that, heavy use of the system was showing that libraries could become quite hard to manage and were clearly lacking some form of organisation.

Therefore, OAE introduces the long-awaited folders functionality, a feature we've been working on for an extended period of time and has gone through many rounds of usability testing. OAE Folders allow for a set of content items to be grouped into a folder. This folder can be shared with other people and groups and has its own permissions and metadata. A folder also has its own thumbnail picture based on the items inside of the folder and folders will generate helpful activities, notifications and emails.

OAE folders also stay true to the OAE philosophy, and therefore content items are never bound to a folder. This means that the items in a folder can still be used as an independent content and can be shared, discussed, etc. individually. This also means that a content item can belong to multiple folders at the same time, opening the door for re-mixing content items and content curation, allowing new interesting folders to be created from existing folders and content items.

Whilst maintaining the ability to grow collaboration organically, OAE Folders allow for a better and more logical organisation of content items and open the door to many interesting content re-use scenarios.

Shibboleth federations

Many countries around the world now expose their own Shibboleth access management federation. This provides an organised and managed way in which an application can be offered to many institutions at the same time, directly integrating with the institutional Single Sign On systems.

OAE Heron makes it possible for an OAE installation to become a recognised Service Provider for one or more of these federations. This dramatically simplifies the tenant creation process for an institution that's a member of one of these access management federations, making it possible to set up an OAE tenant with full Shibboleth SSO integration in a matter of minutes.

Email improvements

OAE Heron introduces significant email notification improvements for those users that have their email preference set to Immediate. OAE was already capable of aggregating a series of actions that happened in quick succession into a single email. OAE Heron makes this possible over a longer period of time, and will hold off sending an email until a series of events that would otherwise generate multiple email notifications has finished. This dramatically cuts down the number of emails that are sent out by OAE and provides a more intelligent email update to users.

The display of email notifications on mobile devices has also been improved significantly, making the content of the email much easier to read.

Activity improvements

OAE Heron offers more descriptive activity summaries, especially in the area of content creation. These will for example provide a much better overview of the context in which an activity happened.

Next to that, OAE Heron will also ensure that the indicator for the number of unread notifications a user has is always completely accurate.

REST API documentation

OAE Heron continues to build on the REST API documentation that was introduced in OAE Griffin. It makes all possible responses for each of the REST endpoints available through the documentation UI and further improves the quality of the available documentation.

Try it out

OAE Heron can be tried out on the project's QA server at http://oae.oae-qa0.oaeproject.org. It is worth noting that this server is actively used for testing and will be wiped and redeployed every night.

The source code has been tagged with version number 9.0.0 and can be downloaded from the following repositories:

Back-end: https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/tree/9.0.0
Front-end: https://github.com/oaeproject/3akai-ux/tree/9.0.0

Documentation on how to install the system can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/blob/9.0.0/README.md.

Instruction on how to upgrade an OAE installation from version 8 to version 9 can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/Hilary/wiki/OAE-Upgrade-Guide.

The repository containing all deployment scripts can be found at https://github.com/oaeproject/puppet-hilary.

Get in touch

The project website can be found at http://www.oaeproject.org. The project blog will be updated with the latest project news from time to time, and can be found at http://www.oaeproject.org/blog.

The mailing list used for Apereo OAE is oae@apereo.org. You can subscribe to the mailing list at https://groups.google.com/a/apereo.org/d/forum/oae.

Bugs and other issues can be reported in our issue tracker at https://github.com/oaeproject/3akai-ux/issues.

by Nicolaas Matthijs at September 25, 2014 12:22 PM

September 19, 2014

Jason Shao

Searching for an ideal home whiteboard

71jkVN7rBjL._SL1500_

I have to admit, a good whiteboard is one of my absolute favorite things in the world. While I absolutely spend all kinds of time writing in text editors, and other digital medium (and have tried just about every tablet/digital/smart-pen replacement for dumb-pens and paper) there is something about how easy it is to work at a whiteboard, especially collaboratively. Maybe it’s good memories of doing work at the board in HS Math.

At home, I recently moved into a new apartment that has a slightly > 8′ long wall space right by the entry. While *clearly* too tight for me to want to put furniture on that wall, the space is *screaming* for a large whiteboard. One of my prime criteria is project/bucket-lists though – so I do expect items to stay up on the board for potentially a *loooooong* time. Looking at options, it seems like we have can figure out something:

  • Actually buying a whiteboard – about $300 for a melamine one, and $4-500 for one made out of porcelain which should last longer (though given I don’t use it all the time, melamine would probably be fine)
  • IdeaPaint – about $100-150, which I have used in offices before, and am a big fan of, but unfortunately requires *really* flat wall surfaces – and not sure it’s worth sanding and re-painting for the small number of blemishes (that absolutely will bother me). There are of course cheaper options – even Sherwin Williams seems to be getting in the game, but those seem to have mixed reviews
  • Mark R Board – the paper guys (Georgia Pacific) – a sample at: http://blog.listia.com/2010/06/08/diy-white-board/
  • Bathtub Reglaze Kit – about $30, plus something for probably a board or the like – seems like this is also a valid refinish strategy – http://wiki.xtronics.com/index.php/Shower_Board_as_a_white_Board
  • IKEA Hacking - about $120 to use a TORSBY glass-top table, picture ledge, and some mirror hangers. Example with pictures at: http://www.ikeahackers.net/2012/01/not-expensive-glass-whiteboard.html
  • White Tile Board – about $20 at Lowes, and even a bunch of comments that it’s a great DIY whiteboard, though some other people have posted notes about it not *quite* being the same, and definitely seeing ghosting if you leave writing on it for more than a few days
  • Decals. http://www.incrediline.com/category-s/1819.htm has some fascinating pre-printed ones – baseball fields, maps, graph paper – that seem really interesting. http://mywhiteboards.com/opti-rite-easy-60.html also has some

Across the different options I have to admit, I think I’m almost definitely going to look into the glass tabletop – I have lusted after that look for a while, and this looks like by far the most reasonably way to get there I’ve seen so far, will post pics once I get something up.

… and then I can build one of these: http://www.cnet.com/news/3d-printed-plotclock-writes-the-time-on-a-tiny-whiteboard-every-minute/ :)

300px-plotclock

by jayshao at September 19, 2014 02:45 PM

September 15, 2014

Sakai@UD

Changing Your Display Name in Sakai@UD

If you are a student and if your name in Sakai (or in other campus systems) is not what you want it to be, you can change it in UDSIS. more >

by Mathieu Plourde at September 15, 2014 04:23 PM